The American Journal of Science and Arts, Volume 2; Volume 52

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S. Converse, 1846

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Page 214 - The hurling stones, they use at present, were, from time immemorial, rubbed smooth on the rocks, and with prodigious labor ; they are kept with the strictest religious care, from one generation to another, and are exempt from being buried with the dead. They belong to the town where they are used and are carefully preserved.
Page 301 - ... after which its springs fail for six days together, and leave its channel dry, as any one may see ; after which days it runs on the seventh day as it did before, and as though it had undergone no change at all ; it hath also been observed to keep this order perpetually and exactly; whence it is that they call it the sabbatic river*, that name being taken from the sacred seventh day among the Jews.
Page 233 - Ampere's theory, this view would be equivalent to the supposition that, as currents are induced in iron and magnetics, parallel to those existing in the inducing magnet or battery wire, so, in bismuth and other diamagnetics, the currents induced are in the contrary direction.
Page 233 - ... if a particle of each kind of matter were placed in the magnetic field, both would become magnetic, and each would have its axis parallel to the resultant of magnetic force passing through it ; but the particle of magnetic matter would have its north and south poles opposite...
Page 434 - Washington, and is managed by a board of regents, composed of the Vice- President of the United States, the Chief Justice of the United States, the...
Page 301 - It hath somewhat very peculiar in it, for when it runs its current is strong and has plenty of water, after which its springs fail for six days together, and leave its channel dry, as any one may see; after which days it runs on the seventh as it did before, and as though it had undergone no change at all. It has also been observed to keep this order perpetually and exactly,, whence it is that they call it the Sabbatic River, that name being taken from the sacred seventh day of the Jews.
Page 439 - Text Book on Chemistry, for the use of Schools and Colleges ; by JOHN WILLIAM DRAPER, MD Harper & Brothers, 1846.
Page 214 - When they have ran a few yards each darts his pole, anointed with bear's oil, with a proper force, as near as he can guess in proportion to the motion of the stone, that the end may lie close to the stone. When this is the case, the person counts two of the game, and in proportion to the nearness of the poles to the mark, one is counted, unless by measuring both are found to be at an equal distance from the stone. In this manner the players will...
Page 214 - ... stone. When this is the case, the person counts two of the game, and in proportion to the nearness of the poles to the mark, one is counted, unless by measuring both are found to be at an equal distance from the stone. In this manner the players will keep running most part of the day at half speed, under the violent heat of the sun, staking their silver ornaments, their nose, finger and ear rings; their breast, arm and wrist plates, and even all their wearing apparel except that which barely...
Page 399 - On the principle of electrical induction, houses thus covered are evidently more liable to be struck than those furnished either with shingle or tile. Fortunately, however, they admit of very simple means of perfect protection. It is evident, from well established principles of electrical action, that if the outside of a house were encased entirely in a coating of metal, the most violent discharge which might fall upon it from the clouds would pass silently to the earth without damaging the house,...

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