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Salt CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,

Northwich, Cheshire, May 6, 1865. Your ExcElLENCY: The salt trade of England, represented by this chamber, have, perhaps more than any other mercantile community of this country, cause to identify their interests with those of the great American people.

The council of this chamber have therefore instructed me, by unanimous resolution, to convey to your excellency their profound grief and heartfelt sympathy with the American nation at the great calamity which has befallen them, through the dastardly assassination of their late President.

In thus representing their condolence, this chamber pray you to accept their earnest assurance of profound respect for your excellency.

JOHN MOORE,

Secretary of the Salt Chamber of Commerce. His Excellency the President of the United States.

At a meeting of the watch committee of the corporation of Newport, in the county of Monmouth, held at the council-house on Tuesday, the 2d day of May, 1865, E. J. Phillips, esq., mayor, in the chair, the following resolution was unarimously agreed to :

That we view with the greatest horror and detestation the atrocious crime by which the President of the United States has been deprived of his life, and that our deep sympathy with the people of the United States for their loss be conveyed with this resolution to the United States consul of this town.

THOS. WOOLLETT,

Town Clerk.

BOROUGH OF NEWPORT, ISLE OF WIGHT.

The following is a copy of a resolution passed at the quarterly meeting of the council of this borough, held on 2d day of May, 1865, at the Guildhall.

Proposed by Mr. Councillor Pinnock, seconded by Mr. Alderman Way, and carried unanimously

That this council desire to record their abhorrence and detestation of the crime which has deprived the American nation of the services of their President, and respectfully offer to the government and to the people of the United States their heartfelt syrr pathy. (SEAL.)

HY. CEW, Mayor.

At a meeting of the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of Nottingham in council assembled, held the 1st day of May, 1965, it was unanimously resolved

That this council desires, in its corporate capacity, to express its extreme sorrow and indignation at the assassination of the late President of the United States of America, and to convey the expression of its condolence and sympathy at the loss which his widow and that nation at large have thereby sustained.

That the members of this council also express their regret at the attempt made

upon the life of Mr. Seward and his sons, and the pleasure with which they this morning receive the news of their improved condition.

Given under the common seal of the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses. (SEAL.]

WILLIAM PAGE, Jayor.

At a public meeting of the inhabitants of Nottingham, held at the Exchange Hall on the 1st day of May, 1865, it was unanimously resolved—

That this meeting regards with horror, indignation, and abhorrence the appalling crime which has put an end to the life of President Lincoln, while it is joices that the dastardly attempt on the life of Mr. Seward bas not resulted in his death, and trusts that he may long be spared for the benefit of his country,

That this meeting desires to record its profound sympathy with the people of the United States in this hour of national bereavement, and more especially with the widow whose grief is intensified by the atrocious nature of the deed which has snatched her husband from her side.

That this meeting devoutly trusts that the wise, statesmanlike, and eminently conciliatory and Christian policy of the late President, so peculiarly suited to bind up the wounds of his bleeding country, may not die with its author, but be carried forward by his successor to the speedy establishment of an enduring peace. Signed by order and on behalf of the meeting:

WILLIAM PAGE, Mayor,

Chairman,

Resolutions passed by the annual assembly of the United Methodist free

churches, held in Nottingham, August, 1865.

THE AMERICAN WAR AND SLAVERY.

1. Resolved, The members of this assembly having during the past four years watched with intense interest and painful anxiety the progress of the civil cnflict upon the American continent, would now express their gratitude to Him by “whom kings reign and princes decree justice that the said sanguinary confict has closed, and upon this auspicious circumstance this assembly most cordially congratulates both the government and people of the United States.

2. Resolved, This assembly is exceedingly grateful to have observed that God in his providence has so overruled the discussions of Congress and the conflict of armies as to have removed from amongst the American people that which has been their dishonor and scourge—chattel slavery; and upon this issue this assembly congratulates not only the American nation, but also all others, believing that the abolition of slavery in the United States will be the prelude to its abolition all over the world.

3. Resol red, This assembly rejoices at the seasonable and well-sustained efforts which have been made by the American people, in order to lessen the distress which los arisen from the immediate emancipation of the slaves of the South, by the feeding and clothing of the aged and infirm and the opening of schools for the education of the young; and this assembly recommends the members of our churches to do what they can by the contribution of both apparel and money, in order to further the object of the "freedinen's aid societies."

4. Resolved, This assembly records its unmitigated abhorrence of, and indig. nation at, the crime of assassination by which the American people have, in the hour of returning order and peace, beeu deprived of one of the most praiseworthy of modern rulers—the patient, sagacious, and philanthropic Abraham Lincoin.

This assembly also expresses its deep and sincere sympathy with the Executive and people of the United States upon their loss; and also, in harmony with the promptly-presented utterances of the British press, platform, senate, and Throne, tenders its condolence to the honored widow of the deceased President.

This assembly, moreover, trusis, now that the war has ceased in the triumph of the northern arms, that henceforth England and America, as they are one in

origin, language, and religion, will cultivate towards each other the most amicable relations, and, being banded together not only as profitable traders but true friends, will by their powerful example and moral influence elevate and bless the world.

5. Resolvcd, That a copy of the aforesaid resolutions be communicated to the honorable Charles Francis Adams for presentation to Mrs. Lincoln and to his Excellency the President of the United States. Signed on behalf of the assembly :

WILLIAM ROBERTS BROWN, President.
MARMADUKE MILLER, Secretary.

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At a meeting of the citizens of Norwich, in Common Hall assembled, on Tuesday, the 2d day of May, 1865, pursuant to a requisition to the mayor, numerously and influentially signed, for the purpose of expressing the sympathy of the city of Norwich to the American governinent and people for the great loss they have sustained by the atrocious murder of their President, the following resolution was unanimously passed, and the mayor was requested to sign and aflix the corporate seal thereto, and forward it to the American minister in London:

Resolved, That this meeting desires to express the greatest regret at the calamity brought upon the people of the United States of America by the assassination of President Lincoln.

That this meeting regards with horror and detestation the crime by which the President's life was sacrificed, and that in the name of the citizens of Norwich, this meeting begs to offer to the government and people of the United States the most sincere and earnest sympathy under the loss which has so suddenly befallen them.

S. E. TUCK, Mayor. (seal.]

Resolution passed at a meeting af the council of the borough of Newcastle

upon Tyne. At a quarterly meeting of the council of the borough of Newcastle-uponTyne, held in the council chamber, Town Hall, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on Wednesday, the third day of May, 1865, Anthony Nichol, esq., deputy mayor, chairman, it was unanimously resolved, on the motion of Mr. Joseph Cowen the younger, seconded by Mr. Alderman Laycock

That this council desires to give utterance to the feelings of grief and horror with which it has heard of the assassination of President Lincoln, and the murderous attack upon Mr. Seward, and to convey to Mrs. Lincoln, President Johnson, and his colleagues, and to the people of the United States, its profound sympathy and heartfelt condolence.

ANTHONY NICHOL, (seal.]

Chairman

Resolution passed at a meeting held by the inhabitants of the borough of

Newcastle upon-Tyne. At a meeting of the inhabitants of the borough of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, convened by the mayor on requisition and held in the Town Hall, on Thursday evening, the 4th of May, 1865, the sheriff of Newcastle in the chair,

On the motion of the Rev. W. Walters, and seconded by Councillor Mawson, and supported by the Rev. J. C. Street, it was unanimously resolved

1st. That this meeting desires to give utterance to the feelings of grief and horror with which it has heard of the assassination of President Lincoln, and the murderous' attack upon Mr. Seward, and to convey to Mrs. Lincoln, to President Johnson, and his colleagues, and to the people of the United States, its profound sympathy and heartfelt condolence.

On the motion of Councillor Benson, seconded by Mr. Ralph Curry, and supported by Councillor Harford, it was unanimously agreed

2d. That copies of the foregoing resolution be placed in the hands of the honorable C. 1. Adams, the American minister, for transmission to his excellency the President of the United States, Jrs. Lincoln, and the honorable W. H. Seward. Signed on bebalf of the meeting:

WILLIAM LOCKLY HARLE, Sheriff

To his Excellency Andrew Johnson, President of the United States of America:

The following resolution was adopted by the sixty-ninth annual conference of the Methodist New Connection, assembled in Salem chapel, Hood street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on the thirteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord 1865:

Resolved, That the conference of the Methodist New Counection, assembled in Newcastle-on-Tyne, would record the expression of its devout thanksgiving and joy on the termination of the war which for four long years has been waged at so fearful a cost of human life and human treasure between the northern and southern divisions of the United States of America. While in the war itself the conference would recognize the supreme justice of eternal Providence in making a nation, however mysteriously, and by whatever means, yet ultimately and surely responsible for the legislative or social wrongs it either authorizes or countenances, it would nevertheless and equally recognize the mercy of that Providence in the conclusion to which the war has been finally conducted, in that a great nation, so intimately allied to our own in all the interests of human civilization and Christian enterprise, has been redeemed from disorder and an. archy by the triumph of the national wisdom and courage, and especially that this has been so done as eflectually to annihilate the evil out of which the war really though not ostensibly sprang, restoring to the position and privileges of manhood four millions of human beings who had previously been held as mere property by those who claimed to be their owners.

The conterence also desires to unite with the whole English nation, and, indeed, with the entire civilized world, in giving emphatic utterance to its horror and abhorrence of the fearful crime by which the close of the war has been sig. nalized, in the assassination of the late much lamented President of the United States, to whose practical wisdom and singular goodness of character may be largely attributed the continuance of the peaceful relations existing between this country and America. Amid the jealousies and perplexities which the war occasioned, as well as to whose prudence and perseverance, together with the prudence and perseverance of those united with him in the conduct of public affairs, the result now enjoyed has been happily reached

And yet the conference would express an earnest hope that no irritation thence resulting, however natural and reasonable, will be allowed to influence the reg. ular course of justice in dealing with those who have taken a leading part in the attempt to divide the Union, by establishing a separate confederacy, and that in fact no means will be adopted but such as will, under the superintendence of the Great Ruler, tend to conciliate the affections and interests of the parties hitherto

so much divided, and so restore them to a condition of permanent harmony and peace. Signed on behalf of the conference :

WILLIAM BAGGARLY, President.

JOSHUA POLLARD, Secretary.

Resolution adopted at a meeting of the E.recutire Council of Newfoundland, on

Saturday, May 6, 1965. That the council avail themselves of the earliest opportunity of expressing their deepest regret and horror at the foul assassination of President Lincoln ; and on behalf of the people of this colony they beg to tender their respectful sympathy in the surrow that has so justly been awakened throughout the American Union at the loss of their illustrious head.

Resolred, That his excellency the Governor be requested to transmit a copy of the foregoing resolution to her Majesty's minister at Washington.

[Translation. ]

THE CITIZENS OF THE SWISS REPUBLIC IN NEW SOUTH WALES.

To the honorable the President, the Senate, and the House of Representatives of the United States of America :

We, the citizens of the Swiss republic, resident at New South Wales, have been requested by Signor John Baptist Jodini, one of our countrymen, to assemble in order, as sons of another free republic, to condole with you, the Congress of America, on the very sad calamity that has befallen your nation, and to express our heartfelt sorrow and sympathetic grief for the immense loss you have sustained by the atrocious murder of your great devoted champion of liberty, President Abraham Lincoln.

We, by birth sons of another free republic, cannot refrain from giving expression of sympathy for your great loss, being ourselves brought up under free principles, and owe it to ourselves and to the republic of which we are citizens to declare our abhorrence of the crime which has deprived humanity of one of its greatest ornaments.

To Mrs. Lincoln and family we offer the respectful condolence of our sympathy with the sufferings which it is some consolation to know are in a degree shared by the world at large, but which are assuaged by the consideration that. Mr. Lincoln's work and best efforts had already gained the approval and ad.miration of every free and enlightened people.

J. B. MODINI.
AUGUSTO ANDREOLI.
ORIOLA AFIRO.
LORENZO BERTA.
GOVANNI GAYLIARDI.
FRANCESCO GALLI.
And forty other names.

At a meeting of the mayor, aldermen, and councillors, being the municip council of the borough of Northampton, held at the Town Hall in the same borough, on the 1st day of May, 1865–present, the worshipful the mayor, Thomas Osborn, esquire, in the chair-it was

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