The Science of Railways, Volume 10

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World railway publishing Company, 1903
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Page 170 - ... passenger service could be obtained with substantial correctness the information would be valuable. . . . But we have not yet arrived at the point of being able to see how a body of inaccurate statistics, which are supposed to support another body of erroneous deductions, can be of practical value. ... It is said a uniform basis must be adopted and maintained to secure the benefit of comparisons, but it is difficult to understand how, if one error is vicious and harmful, an accumulation of errors...
Page 171 - Maintenance of way and structures : Repairs of roadway Renewals of rails Renewals of ties Repairs of bridges and culverts . . . . Repairs of fences, road crossings, signs, and cattle guards Repairs of buildings ...... Repairs of docks and wharves...
Page 172 - Water supplies for locomotives .... All other supplies for locomotives Wages of other trainmen All other train supplies Wages of switchmen, flagmen, and watchmen . Expense of telegraph, including train dispatchers and operators Wages of station agents, clerks, and laborers Station supplies...
Page 301 - ... not receive wages commensurate with the work he performs or the dangers he is compelled to undergo, hence he is unable to keep up his membership in more than one organization, and as a portion of his wages is retained each month for his membership in the relief fund, he has no choice in the matter. A protest will result in discharge, and a discharge forfeits all moneys paid into the fund. The relief fund is a delusion and a snare, and many of the brakemen know it from bitter experience.
Page 170 - Along the same line is an interesting, I might almost say entertaining, committee report presented to and adopted by the annual meeting of the Association of (state) Railway Commissioners in 1892: Every one will admit that if the items of cost of freight and passenger service could be obtained with substantial correctness the information would be valuable. . . . But we have not yet arrived at the point of being able to see how a body of inaccurate statistics, which are supposed to support another...
Page 171 - ... salutary; and it is quite as difficult to see how true statistical instruction may be derived by comparing a large number of errors more or less gross with each other. ... So far, therefore, from the statistics obtained from this division being valuable as affording a criterion for railway rates, we believe that the very fact that this false information is liable to be used is the most cogent reason which could be given for ceasing to furnish a basis confessedly erroneous. A man who travels in...
Page 301 - O'Shea, grand secretary and treasurer of the Brotherhood of Railroad Brakemen, in answer to questions submitted by the Department of Labor in regard to relief associations, said: "Some of the principal lines have lately organized so-called relief associations for the ostensible purpose of 'caring for our dear employees," but the real purpose is to undermine and ultimately to destroy the brotherhood and place the men entirely at the mercy of the corporations. The brakeman does not receive wages commensurate...
Page 357 - PASSENGER TRAFFIC: Number of Passengers Carried Number of Passengers Carried One Mile Average Distance...
Page 301 - ... but the real purpose is to undermine and ultimately to destroy the brotherhood and place the men entirely at the mercy of the corporations. The brakeman does not receive wages commensurate with the work he performs or the dangers he is compelled to undergo, hence he is unable to keep up his membership in more than one organization, and as a portion of his wages is retained each month for his membership in the relief fund, he has no choice in the matter. A protest will result in discharge, and...
Page 304 - ... cents per day for a member of the first class, and of greater amounts for members of the other classes, in proportion to their contributions ; and at half these rates after fifty-two (52) weeks and during the continuance of the disability.

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