The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volume 24

Front Cover
Samuel Johnson
C. Bathurst, 1779
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 108 - Does not the river from the mountain flow, And bring down riches to the vale below? See how the torrent rolls the golden sand From the high ridges to the flatter land. The lofty lines abound with endless store Of mineral treasure, and metallic ore; With precious veins of silver, copper, tin, Without how barren, yet how rich within!
Page 192 - TV admitted nitre agitates the flood, .Revives its fire, and referments the blood. Behold, the streams now change their languid blue, Regain their glory, and their flame renew. With scarlet honours re-adorn'd the tide Leaps on, and bright with more than Tyrian pride, Advances to the heart, and fills -the cave On the left side, which the first motion gave. Now through the same involv'd arterial ways, Again th' exploded jets th
Page 22 - If you say he has broken any law, tell us the law, and by whom it was made. If the laws of the supreme being are set aside, we can lie under no regulation, but have an unbounded liberty over all our actions.
Page 93 - Amidst the glebe, small hollow fibres shoots ; Which drink with thirsty mouths the vital juice, And to the limbs and leaves their food diffuse : Peculiar pores peculiar juice receive, To this deny, to that admittance give.
Page 81 - Saturn in thirty years his ring completes, Which swifter Jupiter in twelve repeats. Mars three and twenty months revolving spends; The earth in twelve her annual journey ends. Venus, thy race in twice four months is run; For his, Mercurius three demands; the moon Her revolution finishes in one. If all at once are mov'd, and by one spring, Why so unequal is their annual ring...
Page 54 - See, how the rip'ning fruits the gardens crown, * Imbibe the sun, and make his light their own. See the...
Page 170 - Nature's power. Hence metals, plants, and minerals arise, The clouds and all the meteors of the skies ! Hence all the clans that haunt the hill or wood, That beat the air, or cut the limpid flood! Even man, their lord, hence into being came, Breath'd the pure air, and felt the vital flame!
Page 178 - From animated rock and flint began. Now to the learned schools of (Greece repair, Who chance the author of the world declare : Then judge if wise philosophers excel Those idle tales, which wanton poets tell.
Page 97 - The' alternate sovereigns of the night and day; View the wide earth adorn'd with hills and woods, Rich in her herds, and fertile by her floods ; Walk through the deep apartments of the main, Ascend the air to visit clouds and rain ; And, while we...
Page 24 - I persuade myself the Epicurean philosophy had not lived so long, nor been so much esteemed, had it not been kept alive and propagated by the famous poem...

Bibliographic information