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Errata.
Page xxiy.

line 22, omit but
xxviii. 121, for “ would” read “ will ”
xxxvii. !122, in a few copies, for “ that he” read “ much that"

6, 1. 15, after good, for "?" write “I”
35,

111, omit “ better"
40,

4, insert a comma after say, and strike out the one after truth
58,

15, insert a comma after “ Presence
95,

3, after “ brethren” insert a semicolon, and continue the paragraph

-, insert a period after “overlooked ”
188,

124, in a few copies, for “ commanding” read “commending"

176,

MEMOIR, &c.

Had the Writer of the following Letters left an account of his religious experience, his life, and pursuits, there is much reason to believe, that such a memoir would have been very interesting and edifying. The hand of another can but faintly describe, the early and powerful visitations of Divine love extended to him; the exercises, spiritual conflicts, and baptisms, which he had to pass through, during the progress of his regeneration; the mercy and saving help vouchsafed to him, in and by our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom, through faith and obedience, he obtained the victory; and by whom, also, he was qualified and enabled to labour that others might be brought to the same happy experience. Yet from an apprehension that to many who may read the Letters, and who were not

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acquainted with the writer, a memoir of his life and character, including a short notice of a few of his principal correspondents, would be acceptable, many of his friends have wished that an account thereof might be given; and having known John Thorp upwards of thirty years, during which time I had frequent opportunities of enjoying his company and conversation, and for the greater part of it an open and unreserved friendship with him, several of my friends, whom I have great reason to esteem, have repeatedly urged me to the undertaking. I would gladly have had the work performed by one better qualified, being sensible of my want of ability to do justice to the subject; yet the regard I have for the memory of my friend, and the desire which I feel to contribute (however feebly) to hand down to posterity some memorial of one deservedly dear to me, have finally prevailed upon me, so far as I may be enabled, to comply with the request.

It will be proper to observe, that John Thorp's own memorandums furnish but very few materials for a memoir of himself; and most of those who were acquainted with him in early life being deceased, not much is now known respecting his conduct and character during that period, except such circumstances as he hath occasionally mentioned in conversation with his intimate friends. To give this account something of the form of a

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