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Page 234 - What constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Page 234 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No, men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain ; These constitute a state ; And sovereign law, that state's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing...
Page 30 - Bacon, that the words of prophecy are to be interpreted as the words of one 'with whom a thousand years are as one day, and one day as a thousand years.
Page 234 - WHAT constitutes a State,? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No ; men, high-minded men...
Page 48 - The soil-pipe should not be connected at any point inside of the house, at least with the other waste pipes, such as those from the bathtub and stationary washbowls. The soil pipe should be ventilated by a pipe which should be as nearly perpendicular as possible, and which should extend above the roof of the house, and should not be placed near a window.
Page 34 - The only way, then, by which they may be avoided is by having the selected samples tested. Any intelligent druggist or chemist will make the analysis for a small fee, which should be at the expense of the paper-dealer. A nice way of finishing inside walls is to paint and then varnish them. The varnish prevents the rubbing off of the paint, and places the walls in such a condition that they may be washed whenever desirable. THE FLOORS. Floors should be made tight, so that they may be thoroughly scrubbed...
Page 102 - The real food value of fruits, judged by their chemical composition, is small, but when thoroughly ripe and well preserved, they act beneficially upon the system, improving the appetite, and maintaining a healthy condition of the various vital organs. Probably no fruit is necessary to life, and fruits may be regarded as luxuries ; but man's instinct and cravings prompt him to obtain them often, even when their cost is considerable.
Page 64 - Although the rations suggested in the preceding tables do not contain meat, they do contain more or less animal food, and are healthy. However, the writer would not recommend one to adhere constantly to them, as some meat, while not necessary to health, does undoubtedly increase bodily vigor. The small amount of really nutritive matter in tea is not considered, and the reader is referred to the articles " Tea " and " Coffee" for a true explanation of the food values of these drinks. It will be seen...
Page 40 - ... pipe will serve as the ventilating flue. I have stated that the register in the ventilating flue should be near the floor. If near the ceiling, as some would have it, there would be too great a loss of heat, as the fresh air as soon as heated would find its exit. For summer ventilation, the foul air outlet may be at or near the ceiling ; but such ventilation in winter costs too much, and, besides, when it is used, great difficulty will often be experienced in heating the room. With the plan recommended...
Page 58 - ... are constantly being worn away and cast out, new material must be introduced in order to make good the loss. Again, it is necessary that our bodies should be supplied with force or energy, that animal heat, muscular movement, and nervous activity may be maintained. For these reasons foods are taken. Foods may be defined as substances which when taken into the body aid in building up or repairing tissue, or, by being oxidized or burned, generate force or energy. Our ordinary foods consist of certain...

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