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"in sympathetic study of India and Indian institutions Germany is far ahead of England” does not need refutation in 1916. But his chief contentions are sane and well stated. He emphasizes the estrangement which has developed during the last twenty-five years and attributes it to the sense of political inequality which is present on both sides. He suggests as requisites for the improvement of the situation : first, that a definite pronouncement on the subject (of the bettering of the political status of educated Indians) should be made by the highest authority entitled to speak in the name of England and that the British Government in India should keep such pronouncement in view in all its actions ; second, that Indians should be enabled to feel that the Government is largely national in spirit ; third, that England should send out to India less and less of those who are not of her best ; fourth, that such Englishmen as come out should realize the profound wisdom of the advice urged on them some time ago by Lord Morley that while bad manners are a fault everywhere they are in India a crime. Nos. 1 and 2 of the “Home Rule Series” are not

1 promising. We hope logic and taste will be more evident in later issues.

W. D.

PERIODICALS. THE LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW.-January

1916. This number contains a wide variety of interesting articles. That on

“Russia's Religion of Suffering” by Stephen Graham lays open to the reader the heart of that patient people which is content to accept suffering as a normal mode of life. An article by W. T. Davidson entitled “God and the World—a Theodicy” is a thoughtful and suggestive treatment of the general problem of the relation of God to the world with special reference to the recent books by Mr. Balfour and Bishop D'Arcy. It is only in the Christian faith that the writer can find any real explanation of the problem of suffering, and there it is through practice rather than thought that the explanation is to be gained. The toiler, the fighter, the sufferer, who are already workers together with God, are on the way to learn the secret which only conquest can explain.”

Mrs. Billington writes on “ Women's Share in the War's Work" and gathers together an impressive array of

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facts to show the way in which the women of the nation have more than risen to their opportunity. And from this Mrs. Billington hopes for much in the future. As yet," she says, “we do not know the fullness of the uplifting. But there has been a truce to many factions not to be reopened again. Women have found themselves, as never before, in a world torn by stress and suffering on which they have looked with calm, sturdy perception to discover paths that are to lead them to yet greater service to humanity.” To those who know Mrs. Billington only as a militant suffragette this article may be commended as itself evidence of the new spirit that has entered public life.

Among other articles those by Principal Garvie on “Gethsemane and Calvary-Good Thoughts for Bad Times” and by J. Agar Beet on "A Century of Progress" may be mentioned as of special interest.

G. E.

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THE QUARTERLY REVIEW.- January 1916. But for an article on “ The Prose Works of Joseph Addison," the January Quarterly is concerned exclusively with the deeds of nations. Our Allies receive the highest praise. Madame Duclaux' article “ A Chaplet of Heroes" is a funeral oration over five brilliant young Frenchmen of letters, all of whom died in the first few weeks of the war. For all of them the war was a crusade, a way of salvation from national and individual death. Monsieur Davignon, in his article on German Methods of Penetration in Belgium Before and During the War” shows how Germany mobilized intellectual, political, and religious forces against Belgium-and how nobly Belgium answered. In his article “South Africa and her German Neighbour,” Mr. R. C. Hawkins gives a lucid account of the prompt and effective action taken by the Government there.

The Quarterly's examination of our own affairs is less inspiring. Mrs. Fawcett, writing on war relief and war service, says:

" That in the richest country in the world large numbers of women should be normally in receipt of less than subsistence wages is not only a scandal, it represents a national danger.” She proceeds to suggest that "the disgraceful waste which has characterized the administration of the training camps for soldiers is largely due to the fact that women have not been put to do their job."

In another article the methods of the Censor are severely criticized. The theory that ministers should at present be immune from criticism is rejected as contradicting

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the principle of “popular” government.

popular" government. Sir John Simon's policy is mistakenly based on what may affect Germany instead of on what may affect Allies and neutrals. Our Press does not describe the work of battalions and thus lets slip a unique opportunity for stimulating recruiting-and for giving the soldier that glory which is his only reward, and perhaps his chief encouragement. To persuade her to send goods and lend money, America is informed of indecisive battles and unsuccessful diplomacy : she hears nothing of the self-sacrifice of the nation.

Colonel Blood's article on the course of the war condemns the “wait and see” policy which dissuaded the Serbians from making a decisive stroke, the Government's determination to “run risks and encounter dangers” against the advice of military experts (as in the Dardanelles), the lack of statesmanlike foresight and the blindness to the aims of Germany. (But surely this last defect is pardonable while the science of criminology is still in its infancy.)

These charges are the text of the article on British Government and War.” The British Government have done those things which they ought not to have done and have left undone those things which they ought to have done. Three reasons are formulated. British military power is over-centralized, with the result that there is no planning of operations (the Dardanelles enterprise and others just “ growed”). Secondly, our Cabinet government is unsuitable for the carrying on of war. A body of twentytwo busy men cannot meet frequently for consultation. Nevertheless the supreme conduct of this war was directed for fifteen months by weekly meetings of the Cabinet. To speak more accurately, it was not directed at all, any more than the action in a classical tragedy is directed by the chorus of well-meaning old men who hold the stage at definite intervals and ask each other what is to be done. And, just as the chorus in these plays is often temporarily broken up into semi-choruses or groups, so the Cabinet used to divide itself into a variety of Committees - War Committee, Dardanelles Committee, National Service Committee, half a hundred committees, in fact, if the Prime Minister is to be believed-without ever divesting itself of its fundamental characteristics of indecision and procrastination.” The remedy suggested is a reconstitution of the Committee of Imperial Defence created by Mr. Balfour ten years ago. Lastly, the party system has destroyed the power of acting. Our statesmen “wait and see.” At least they wait.

W. D.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS. Administration Report on the Jails of Bihar and Orissa for the year 1914. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Annual Report of the Archäological Department, Southern Circle, Madras, for the year 1914-15. Government of Madras.

, . Annual Report of the Civil Veterinary Department, Bihar and Orissa, for the year 1914-15. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Annual Report on the Police Administration of the Town of Calcutta and its Suburbs for the year 1914. Government of Bengal.

Annual Report on the Punjab Veterinary College, Civil Veteri. nary Department, Punjab, and the Government Cattle Farm, Hissar, for the year 1914-15. Punjab Government.

Annual Report on the Working of Co-Operative Societies in the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh for the year 1914-15. Government of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh.

Annual Returns of the Hospitals and Dispensaries in Bihar and Orissa for the year 1914 with Notes. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Annual Statistical Returns and Short Notes on Vaccination in Bengal for the year 1914-15. Government of Bengal.

Fifty-third Annual Report of the Government Cinchona Plantations and Factory in Bengal for the year 1914-15. Government of Bengal.

Final Forecast of the Early Variety of the Sesamum (Til) Crop of Bihar and Orissa for the year 1915. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Final Forecast of the Jute Crop in Assam, 1915. Government of Assam.

Final Forecast of the Jute Crop for 1915. Government of Bengal.

Final Forecast of the Jute Crop of Bihar and Orissa, 1915. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Final Forecast of the Winter Rice Crop of Bihar and Orissa, 1915.

Government of Bihar and Orissa. First Forecast of the Winter Rice Crop of Bengal, 1915-16. Government of Bengal.

Indian Education in 1913-14. Government of India.

Indian Local Self-Government Policy, 1915. Being a Resolution issued by the Governor-General in Council on the 28th April 1915. Government of India.

Loan Exhibition of Antiquities, Coronation Durbar, 1911. Published by the Archæological Survey of India. Government of India.

Monthly Accounts relating to the Sea-borne Trade and Navigation of British India. August, September, October, November, December 1915, January, February, March 1916. Government of India.

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Note on the Registration Returns of the Punjab for the year 1914. Punjab Government.

Note on the Stamp Statements of the Punjab for the year 1914-15. Punjab Government.

Preliminary Forecast of the Bhadoi Crops of Bengal, 1915-16. Government of Bengal.

Preliminary Forecast of the Bhadoi Crops of Bihar and Orissa, 1915. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Preliminary Forecast of the Indigo Crop of Bihar and Orissa for 1915. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Preliminary Forecast of the Late Variety of the Sesamum (Til) Crop of Bihar and Orissa for the year 1915. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Quarterly Civil List for Bengal. CXCVI, July 1915; CXCVII, October 1915; CXCVIII, January 1916. Government of Bengal.

Quarterly Indian Army List. October 1915; January 1916. Government of India.

Report on the Administration of Criminal Justice in the Punjab and its Dependencies during the year 1914. Punjab Government.

Report on the Administration of the Excise Department in the Province of Assam for the year 1914-15. Government of Assam.

Report on the Administration of the Police of the United Provinces for the year ending 31st December 1914. Government of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh.

Report on the Administration of the Salt Department in Bengal during the year 1914-15. Government of Bengal.

Report of the Agricultural Department of Bihar and Orissa, for the year ending the 30th June 1915. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Report of the Assistant Archæological Superintendent for Epigraphy, Southern Circle, for the year 1914-15. Government of Madras.

Report on the Atarra Experimental Station, District Banda, for the year ending the 30th June 1915. Government of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh.

Report on the Cawnpore Agricultural Station in the United Provinces for the year ending 30th June 1915. Government of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh.

Report of the Department of Fisheries for the period 1st April 1914 to 1st June 1915. Punjab Government.

Report on the Excise Administration of the United Provinces for the year ending 31st March 1915. Government of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh.

Report on the Excise Administration of the Punjab during the year 1914-15. Punjab Government.

Report on the Income-tax Administration of the Punjab during the year 1914-15. Punjab Government.

Report on the Land Revenue Administration of the Province of Bihar and Orissa for the year 1914-15. Government of Bihar and Orissa.

Report on Police Administration in the Punjab for the year 1914. Punjab Government.

Report on the Production of Tea in India in the Calendar Year 1914. Government of India.

Report on Sanitation in Bengal for the year 1914, being the Forty-seventh Annual Report of the Sanitary Commissioner, the

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