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TH, Tv Etv YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
319187

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.

1907

BOOK OF THE ROYAL BLUE.

.

PUBLISHED MONTHLY.
COPYRIGHT, 1904, BY THE PASSENGER DEPARTMENT, BALTIMORE & Ohio RAILROAD.

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UT to the purpling pastures and the hill-tops tinged with brown;

Out to the haze-hung valleys and out from the red-walled town;
Out to the breeze-fanned grasses and trees that are whisp'ring low
Tearful farewells to their leaflets ere Winter bids them go;
Out to the heart of Nature where cloistered with Nature's God,
We'll gather the purple asters and glorious golden-rod.
Home in the Autumn gloaming fraught with a promise of cold
Laden, we'll come at evening, bearing our pugplo and gold.

EVENING

Home from the purpling pastures, from the hill-tops fringed with browa,
Home from the haze-veiled valleysi beick into the red-walled town;
Home from the breeze-swayed grasses and trees that were sighing low
Tearful good-bye to the leaflets Winter had whispered “Go!"
Home from the lap of Nature where, hidden with Nature's God,
We took of the purple asters and glorious golden-rod.
Now, in the Autumn gloaming, chill with its promise of cold,
Hasten we, heavy laden with purple and glowing gold.

L'ENVOI

Autumn of life is coming with shadows of dun and brown;
Out of the hills we'll hasten and into a shining town
Walled in a wealth of jasper with settings of priceless stones;
Paeans of joy will mingle with all of our earth-taught moans;
One will await our coming; and He, with all-seeing eye,
Quickly will view our burdens--them a ill he reckon us by.
They will be blessed past measure, who, as they enter the fold,
Show him Truth's royal purple and a pure heart's gleaming gold.

SKETCHES.

BY R. M. CHESHIRE.

THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD.

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THE CHESAPEAKE & OHIO CANAL.

HOULD the Chesapeake & Ohio and had offices at Fifth and Walnut streets,

Canal, the waterway of which Philadelphia. Stockholders” sent in
George Washington was the founder their assessments and contributions with

and which runs almost parallel with such rapidity that there was never a time the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad from Wash- when the managers stood in urgent need ington to Cumberland, pass into other of funds to pay every running expense. hands and be utilized as a roadbed for a Business was brisk from the very inceprailway, it will be the doing away of one tion of the enterprise, and when the Fugiof the main lines of the old Underground tive Slave law passed in 1850 there were Railroad.

funds to establish stations along various lines and keep a regular force of trusted men constantly employed in engineering runaway expeditions for slaves.

John Hunn was the chief engineer of the Southern end; Samuel Burriss, colored, general conductor; Levi Coffin and John Needles, presidents. There was a board of directors or vigilance committee,” composed of such men as Nathaniel Depee, J. C. White, Henry Gordon, Robert Purvis, William Whipper, Samuel Rhoades, Rev. W. H. Furniss, J. M. McKim, William Lloyd Garrison and others, not to mention a number of wealthy and influential ladies

who gave freely of their money and time. This old Underground Railroanl was a Money was spent where it was believed mysterious organization which existed: thom it would do the most good, and when it 1838 until Emancipation; it had no šąlaried was found that captains or masters of boats officers, no public reports; •rfo: fäst.fying on the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal were schedules, and declaredo. dividends. approachable " there was no time lost in For one purpose only was sit .orgånized to assist fugitive slaves in reaching a place of safety. So perfectly were the plans of the “railroad” carried out that the lines and stations extended from and through almost every Southern State and into Pennsylvania, Indiana, Ohio, New York and all the Eastern and New England States and on into Canada. Quiet, easygoing Quakers of Philadelphia were the originators and promoters of the Underground Railroad, and they gave liberally of their money to perfect the organization. After the “system” was thoroughly understood by the abolitionists throughout the country there was no difficulty in securing enlisting their aid for a consideration. all the money needed to pay every expense. There was less danger of detection of Samuel Rhoades, a wealthy Philadelphian, fugitive slaves on vessels than on trains was the chief financier—the J. P. Morgan or private conveyance. They could be -of the enterprise. While on a visit to stored away in coal, hay, or whatever kind England he raised a very large sum for the of cargo the boat might be laden. If Underground. Charles Wise was treasurer there was believed to be danger of being

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A "STATION" NEAR PAW PAW. W. VA.

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