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.יבאישו ויביעו original Reading was probably

,הלשון or ; לבעל הלשון for the Exigentia loci thus fixes the Senfe of

DEAD FLIES CAUSE A STINKING SAVOUR, and PUTRIFY THE OINTMENT OF THE APOTHECARY; as in the old Version. The

y . HERE the Author, having finished his Excursion in Quest of the leading Characters, which have always disgraced human Nature in all luxurious States, throws off the Mask, appears in his own Person, and from hence to the Close of the Book inculcates grave and serious Maxims, suggesting proper Antidotes against the Poison of some of the foregoing Tenets.

V. 11, Surely the Serpent will bite without Enchantment ; and a Babbler . :' ] There seems to be no sort of Connection between these two Clauses, as they are translated in our Version. The Verse ought to be rendered ---IF THE SERPENT BITE NOTWITHSTANDING THE ENCHANTMENT, SURELY there is no ADVANTAGE in AN ENCHANTER :

;, , by a Transposition of Letters, may be a Mistake for womb, as 172 for any in the last Ch. V.4. The LXX, Aquila, and the Syriac, seem to have had this latter Reading in their Texts.

V. 12. - but the Lips of a fool will swallow up himself., nous : ] — WILL DESTROY HIM: thus yha is rendered in other Places. V. 15. The Labour of the foolish wearieth every one of them : ay

]

- WEARIETH HIM; as in the old Version. - because he knoweth not how to go to the city. nasib yoyib que : 7y ] Rather — WHO KNOWETH NOT (or cannot prevail upon himself to take the Trouble to learn) How &c. The Phrase, how to go to the City, seems to be proverbial, and to denote à Thing easy and obvious,

V. 16. and thy Princes eat in the Morning. :150ps paa yhtey] Rather -- FEAST &c. for the next Verse fhews that this is the Sense; and that those Feasts were attended with Excess both in eating and drinking V. 20.

for a Bird of the Air shall carry the Voice D'Out FV ?

] a fine poetical Image. So Virgil, Æn. IV. v. 175. - mox sese attollit in auras &c.

CH A P.

Rather [כסיר תבלענו :

Rather [הכסילים תיגענו

The representing Fame as endowed with Wings is [ יוליך את הקול

[blocks in formation]

Rather [ אם ימלאו העבים- גשם על הארץ יריקו

V.1. Cast thy Bread upon the Waters :-0997 up by gon's ribey] Some Critics understand this enigmatical Expression as a Direction to sow one's Seed in a moist Suil : but if that be good Husbandry, it is not however suitable to the Context. The old Version seems to give the true Meaning, viz. “ Be liberal to the poor ; and though it seem “ to thee as a Thing ventured on the Sea, yet it shall bring thee Profit.”

V. 3. If the Clouds be full of Rain, they'empty themselves upon the Earth :

]

IF THE CLOUDS BE FULL, THEY POUR DOWN THE RAIN UPON The Earth. This seems to intimate, “ that the rich ought to dif“ tribute out of their Abundance to the poor.” In the same Sense the next Sentence ought, I think, to be understood, viz. where the Tree falletb, there it all be, i. e. “where a Favour has been conferred, “there it remains, or is not soon forgotten.”

V.4. He that observeth the Wind shall not fow &c. S 717 now "72) — 797] This I apprehend is not to be confined to the mere Letter, but to be understood as a general Caution against Procrastination.

V. 8. But if a Man live many Years, and rejoice in them all: DX 'y how saa 6787 m nanh Dilw] This Verse, like the next, ought, I think, to be construed as an Irony - But IF A MAN LIVE MANY YEARS, LET HIM REJOICE IN THEM ALL. - yet let him remember the Days of Darkness ; for they skall be

: :ban xe] Rather, I think -- BUT LET HIM REMEMBER THE DAYS OF DARKNESS, THAT THEY ARE MANY, and that ALL THAT COMETH is VANITY.

- and let thy Heart cheer thee in the Days of thy Youth. ] These Words 7in171na imala ought, I think, to be here rendered — IN THY CHOICEST DAYS, particularly as those Words, in thy Youth, immediately precede.

C H A P. XII.

ויזכר את ימי החשך כי הרבה יהיו כל .many

.
All that cometb is Vanity

V.9.

V.1.

- while the evil Days come not — 1199 999 982 85 98 98] Rather BEFORE THE EVIL DAYS COME ; for that is the Force of these three Particles thus united.

V.4.

V.5.

and be Mall rise up at the Voice of the Bird bps Dupa 71597) As there is no Antecedent to the Relative in the Text; it would, I think, be best either to supply — AND a Man WILL RISE UP; or construe the Verb impersonally, viz. AND ONE RISETH UP AT THE SINGING OF THE BIRD.

- and all the Daughters of Mufick - On mua 5a] Or- THE WOMEN SINGERS.

—and the Almond Tree shall flourish : 7pun rx3] All Critics agree that this Paffage relates to the Infirmities of old Age: but how the Phrase-the Almond Tree shall flourish. - can possibly imply that “ their Heads shall be as white as the Blossoms of an Almond « Tree," as it is explained in the Margin of our old Version, I cannot conceive. No Language I believe can justify such a Figure: neither is it true that the Blossoms of an Almond Tree are white. I would therefore render these Words --- AND HE THAT IS WAKEFUL SHALL BE CONTEMNED; for it is well known that old People sleep little ; and that, on account of their Infirmities, they are too often the Sport of the inconsiderate.

and the Graskopper shall be a Burden, dann and"). This Expression is as unintelligible as the preceding one. Jerom had long since affirmed that aan lignified the Ankle as well as a Locust; and it is evident that this Word in Arabic is used for the Thigh : wherefore I would thus translate the Text, with the Chaldee ANKLE SHALL BE A BURDEN TO ITSELF ; or unable to support the Burden of the Body.

V.6. Or ever the Silver Cord be loosed; —1037 ban print's 087»] By this Figure must, I think, be meant the Spinal Marrow.

or the golden Bowl be broken :— 2016 nba yonil That is, I imagine, “ Before the Head is reduced to a mere empty Scull,” not unlike then in Colour to Gold, or in Form to a Bowl.

- or the Pitcher be broken at the Fountain :-992299 by nowny] Perhaps — “Before the Circulation of the Blood be stopped at the “ Heart."

or the Wheel broken at the Cistern. : 900 sepasan ponse] Possibly Before the general Diffolution of the whole Mass, Solids " and Fluids."

V.7. - and the $pirit shall return unto God who gave it. 01971 :,]

Oo

AND THE

Here the Author takes Care that no [תשוב אל האלהים אשר נתנה:

one

V. 10.

one might be miled by what had been asserted by those who supposed the Soul became extinct on it’s Separation from the Body.

- and that which was written was upright, even the Words of Truth. :nos 27 * Jinsi] I read with the Syriac and Vulgate and and construe 70° adverbially, or supply the Preposition 2, thus AND NEWROTE PROPERLY THE WORDS OF TRUTH.

V. 11. The Words of the wife are as Goads, and as Nails fastened by the Masters of Assemblies, which are given from one Shepherd. 1927 : ] Rather THE WORDS OF THE WISE are AS GOADS, OR AS Nails that are FASTENED : THE COLLECTORS of them WERE APPOINTED BY ONE SHEPHERD. By Shepherd in this place our Translators understood God to be meant. He is indeed called the Shepherd of Israel: but by this Expression Solomon seems to point out himfelf ; for this Title is more than once given to Kings, Isa. XLIV. 28. Ezek. XXXIV. 23. and we know of no other King before him, who collected Proverbs.

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[ לריח שמניך טובים - שמן תורק שמך :is as Ointment poured fortb

VERSE 3. Because of the Savour of thy good Ointments, thy Name

: ] Rather THY NAME is AN OINTMENT POURED FORTH, LIKE The Savour of THY GOOD OINTMENTS. Thus § is used, Josh. VII. 5. 1 Sam. XXV. 37. &c. V.4. Draw me, we will run after thee :

we will run after thee: 178993 goong"3520D ] All the ancient Versions seem to have had these Words in their Text, viz. 7'90 772; for they all add here--on account of thine Ointments.

V. I have compared thee, O my Love, to a Company of Horses in Pharaoh's Chariots. : 'N'Y9 7'0'97 1799 2992 NODS] The Word inop's occurs nowhere in ss. in this Form. The ancient Versions consider it as the fingular -or plural Feminine with the Affix: but I think it may not improperly be construed as special with our Version, and of the Masculine Gender, as if it were written fully, Dimidid). The Comparison of a beautiful Woman to a Set of Horses harnessed in a Chariot may perhaps appear uncouth to the refined Manners of this Age. "But let it be remembered that the Greek and Latin Poets frequently compare the same Object to an Heifer, a Cre far infe

Oo 2

rior

9.

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