Hume's Abject Failure: The Argument Against Miracles

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2000 M11 23 - 232 pages
This vital study offers a new interpretation of Hume's famous "Of Miracles," which notoriously argues against the possibility of miracles. By situating Hume's popular argument in the context of the eighteenth-century debate on miracles, Earman shows Hume's argument to be largely unoriginal and chiefly without merit where it is original. Yet Earman constructively conceives how progress can be made on the issues that Hume's essay so provocatively posed about the ability of eyewitness testimony to establish the credibility of marvelous and miraculous events.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Appendix on Probability
75
Notes
77
Works Cited
87
Additional Bibliography
93
THE DOCUMENTS
95
Index
213
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information