Lessons in Language and Grammar, Book 2

Front Cover
Ginn, 1900
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Contents

Letters of Recommendation
17
Advertisements
18
Formal Notes
20
Telegrams
22
DESCRIPTION I Description of Objects
24
Brief Biography
25
Paragraph Writing
26
Description of Animals
28
Description of Things
31
Description of Persons
33
Descriptive Terms
39
Contrasted Descriptions
41
Description for Comparison
43
NARRATION I Stories to be Imitated
44
II
45
Stories to be Written
48
Dialogues
49
Imaginative Writing
51
REPRODUCTIONS AND ESSAYS
53
Reproduction with Outline and Abstract
54
II
55
PAGE
57
6
59
Subjects and Hints for Essays
61
16 17 18
63
20
64
Variety of Exercises with a Story as the Basis
65
A STUDY OF LONGFELLOW
71
The Boyhood of Longfellow
73
Poems for Study
77
Hiawathas Childhood
78
Longfellow and the Children
79
Poems to be Read
82
The Home of Longfellow PAGE 54 59 61 64 65 73 77 78 79 82
83
Biography of Longfellow VIII The Pictures of Puritan Life
85
The Courtship of Miles Standish
86
Evangeline
89
Subjects for Compositions 85 86 89 91 91 XII Morituri Salutamus
91
CHAPTER VII
92
Use of Introductory Words
95
Natural Position of Modifiers
96
Natural Position of Adjective Modifiers
97
Natural Position of Adverbial Modifiers
98
The Adjective
99
Order of Emphasis Subject Emphatic
101
Predicate Adjective Emphatic
102
Object Emphatic
104
Adverbial Elements Emphatic
105
Style Its Qualities
107
Unity
108
Brevity Superfluous Words
111
Brevity Words Understood
112
Brevity Words instead of Phrases or Clauses
113
Clearness
115
Ambiguity The Sentence
117
Ambiguity The Participle
118
Ambiguity The Personal Pronoun
119
Ambiguity The Relative Pronoun
120
Attractiveness Similar Parts of Sentences
121
Attractiveness Repeated Words
124
Attractiveness Variety XXIV Exaggeration
127
Figures of Speech The Simile
128
Figures of Speech The Metaphor
130
Figurative and Commonplace Statements XXVIII Contrast PAGE 115 117 118 119 I 20 121 124
133
Secretarys Records
136
Copy of Record
150
Credentials
151
Petitions
152
SYNONYMS I Finding Synonyms II Selecting the Right Word
154
III
156
Words not Synonyms
157
Distinction in Synonyms
161
CHAPTER X
164
The Subject and the Predicate
165
The Noun
166
The Parts of Speech 182
182
i94 XVI Analysis Continued
186
The Adjective Comparison
190
The Adjective and the Adverb How Distinguished
194
The Noun Common and Proper
195
Number
197
The Noun
200
Gender
202
The Verb Transitive and Intransitive
204
Case XXV Case XXVI Case XXVII Case
206
Apposition
212
The Possessive The Objective
213
Case Direct and Indirect Objects
215
Adverbial Use of Nouns
216
Modifying Complements
218
Person of Nouns and Pronouns 216 218
220
The Compound Personal Pronoun
222
The Relative Pronoun
223
The Indefinite Relative Pronoun
225
The Interrogative Pronoun
226
The Adjective Pronoun
227
Declension
228
Agreement of a Pronoun with its Antecedent
230
Voice
231
Mode
233
Tense
235
Person and Number of Verbs
238
Number of Verbs Continued
239
Conjugation The Auxiliaries
247
223
266
The Sentence Simple Complex and Compound
268
4 5
274
Construction of the Infinitive and the Participle
275
Rules of Syntax
281
II
287
The Comma in a Series
293
SECTION PAGE XVI The Comma with Words in the Same Construction
306
The Comma in Compound Elements
307
The Comma with Adverbial Elements
309
The Comma after the Subject
310
The Comma with Independent Elements
311
The Use of the Semicolon
316
The Use of Parentheses and Brackets
317
The Use of the Dash
318
An Exercise in Punctuation
319
གླ85 ΙΟΙ 102
323
141
324
41 43 www 24 25 26 28
325
49
326
227
327
107
328
108
330
112
331
113
332
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Page 40 - I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils ; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay : Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Page 103 - Fair was she to behold, that maiden of seventeen summers. Black were her eyes as the berry that grows on the thorn by the wayside, Black, yet how softly they gleamed beneath the brown shade of her tresses!
Page 215 - I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses; I linger by my shingly bars; I loiter round my cresses; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river: For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Page 294 - To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, To smooth the ice, or add another hue Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish, Is wasteful, and ridiculous excess.
Page 319 - What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, And, with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, ' The names of those who love the Lord.
Page 319 - ABOU BEN ADHEM (may his tribe increase!) Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace, And saw within the moonlight in his room, Making it rich and like a lily in bloom, An angel writing in a book of gold: Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold, And to the presence in the room he said, "What writest thou?
Page 308 - Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding: For the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver, and the gain thereof than fine gold. She is more precious than rubies: and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her.
Page 75 - Spanish sailors with bearded lips, And the beauty and mystery of the ships, And the magic of the sea. And the voice of that wayward song Is singing and saying still: 'A boy's will is the wind's will, And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.
Page 46 - I'll not deny you make A very pretty squirrel track; Talents differ; all is well and wisely put; If I cannot carry forests on my back, Neither can you crack a nut.
Page 43 - In one corner was a stagnant pool of water, surrounding an island of muck; there were several half-drowned fowls crowded together under a cart, among which was a miserable, crest-fallen cock, drenched out of all life and spirit; his drooping tail matted, as it were, into a single feather, along which the water trickled from his back...

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