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The Education of Man. By Friedrich Froebel. Translated from the German and annotated by W. N. Hailmann, A. M., Superintendent of Public Schools at La Porte, Ind. New York: D. Appleton & Co.

This book may be called an exposition of Froebel's philosophy. In it are set forth the fundamental principles upon which bis kindergarten system is based. The author's original plan included several volumes, of which the volume before us is the first. The others were never written, because the author became too much engaged in efforts to exemplify his principles practically against great obstacles. This volume deals with the development of man in infancy and early childhood. Froebel had wonderful power to impart his own spirit to his associates. His writings contain a good deal of the same power. Concerning the first two chapters of this book, Dr. Wm. T. Harris says they "deserve a thorough annual study by every teachers' reading club in the land.”

Ginn and Company, Boston, are still adding to their excellent "Classics for Children." The last to make its appearance on our table is Walter Scott's Rob Roy. There is an introduction by Miss Yonge, and an extensive glossary at the close. The copious foot-notes will prove helpful to the young reader. It is printed in large type on clear white paper, binding uniform with the rest of the series. It is an excellent service the publishers are doing the young people by bringing within their reach such stores of interesting and excellent reading. The use of such books will tend to beget a taste for reading as well as the ability to read.

Complete German Manual for High Schools and Colleges. By Wesley C. Sawyer, Ph. D., author of "A Practical German Grammar.” Chicago : John C, Buckbee & Co.

Neither the “Natural Method” nor the “Grammar Method” alone is found to yield satisfactory results in the modern languages. The author of this Manual has happily combined the two. The mastery of principles through the understanding and efficiency in the use of the language through practice and drill are made to walk hand in hand, supporting and supplementing each other.

A New Part-Song and Chorus Book, for High Schools, Academies, Choral Societies and Families. By Chas. E. Whiting, formerly Teacher of Music in the Boston Public Schools. Boston: D. C. Heath & Co.

This book consists of six departments; viz , Condensed Elementary Course; Vocal exercises; Two-, Three-, and Four-Part Solfeggios; Three- and FourPart Songs; Anthems and Choruses; and Hymn-Tunes. It contains many original pieces as well as choice selections from the German, English, and American composers.

Benjamin Franklin as a Man of Letters, by John Bach McMaster, is the latest issue in the "American Men of Letters” series, from the press of Houghton, Mifflin and Company, Boston. Starting with his christening in the old South Church on a January morning in 1706, the biographer carries us along with unflagging interest until the remains of "Poor Richard" are laid

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beside those of his wife in the yard of Christ Church in 1790. It is a fine piece of literary work, presenting the reader with vivid pictures of the great and good man in his character of philosopher and statesman, as well as journalist and author. Besides the character, literary career and public services of Franklin, there are glimpses of other noted characters and of the times in which they lived which intensify the reader's interest and add to his regret at laying down the book.

Primary Methods. A complete and methodical presentation of the use of kindergarten material in the work of the primary school, unfolding a systematic course of training in connection with Arithmetic, Geometry, Drawing, and other school studies. By W. M. Hailmann, A. M., Superintendent of Public Schools, La Porte, Ind. A. S. Barnes & Co., New York and Chicago.

This book will meet the growing demand among primary teachers for the adjusting and fitting of kindergarten methods to the primary school. The gifts and occupations of the kindergarten become the systematic "busy work” of the school.

Miss Stickney's Primer, published by Ginn & Company, Boston, is a charming book for the little people. It is worthy of its place among the author's "Classics for Children.” Our copy has gone to a little six-year-old, bearing on its fly-leaf the inscription, “A birth-day present from Grandpa-Thanksgiving, 1887.”

Graded German Lessons: Being a practical German Grammar. By William Eysenbach. Revised and largely re-written, with notes to the exercises, reading lessons and vocabularies, by William C. Collar, A. M., Head Master Roxbury Latin School. Ginn and Company, Boston.

This revision of Eysenbach's German Grammar was made while carrying two classes in the Roxbury Latin School through the book. The misunder. standings and difficulties of the pupils from day to day served to point out what additions, omissions, and changes were needed. Copious notes to the exercises constitute one prominent feature of the revision, and another is a great increase in the quantity and variety of selections for reading. The general plan of the book seems to be a happy union of the Natural and Grammar methods.

Washington and His Country is a recent addition of Ginn and Company (Boston) to their Classics for Children. It is an abridgment of Irving's Life of Washington, with an introduction containing a brief account of discoveries and colonization in America, and a continuation down to the close of the civil war, by John Fiske. It is a very entertaining history of our country—one that young people will read with pleasure, leaving it with an appetite for

more.

A Practical Course in Qualitative Analysis, for use in High Schools and Colleges. By John W. Simmons, Superintendent of City Schools, Dowagiac, Mich. With additions for Students' Work, by La Roy F. Griffin, Professor of Physical Science, Lake Forest University. Chicago : John C. Buckbee & Co. 1888.

This little book is designed to supplement any of the ordinary text-books

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on chemistry, furnishing sufficient material for pretty thorough laboratory practice without requiring a large amount of costly apparatus.

A Practical Course for the Study of the German Language. By Rudolph Leonhart, A. M. Published by the author, at Canton, 0. Price 50 cents.

Prof. Leonhart has been a life-long teacher of the German language, and out of his large experience he has prepared a book for beginners which is at once eminently practical and reasonably thorough. The "How I Was EducatedPapers. From the Forum Magazine. Paper

30 cents. D. Appleton & Co., New York. In these papers, Edward E. Hale, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, F. A P. Barnard, John H. Vincent, William T. Harris, S. C. Bartlett, J. R. Kendrick, Timothy Dwight, E. G. Robinson, James B. Angell, and Andrew D. White, each in his own way, tell tbe story of their education. Teachers and persons engaged in the work of their own education will find much to entertain and profit.

Harper and Brothers, New York, have issued a new and revised edition of Hooker's Child's Book of Nature, in three very neat little volumes, or bound together in one volume. The work is designed to aid mothers and teachers in training children to observe plants, animals and natural phenomena. These books in the hands of the children, under the direction of intelligent mothers, are of more value than all the spelling books in the universe.

Animal Life in the Sea and on the Land: A Zoology for Young People. By Sarah Cooper. New York: Harper and Brothers.

Starting with the lower forms of life, as the sponge, the author traces in sim. ple and pleasing style a gradual development up to the highest. The aim is to lead young people to observe and study the animal kingdom, rather than to commit to memory facts stated in a book about animals. Animal structure and adaptation of structure to habits receive special attention. The book is profusely and finely illustrated. It is an excellent book for either school or home use.

The Science of Education. Designed as a Text-Book for Teachers. By Francis B. Palmer, Ph. D. Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati and New York.

This book will be widely read. It strikes out on new lines of thought. It is a book for thinkers, not for dreamers. The author undertakes to ground the art of methods on the science of the process of mental development apart from the science of psychology. He says that to make the science of psychology the basis of the art of methods is like making the science of botany the basis of the art of farming. “The science of psychology is the science of mind in a developed state,” but it furnishes no aid in determining the best means and methods of mental development. We have not time to sorm a final judgment in regard to this book, but we feel safe in advising those of our readers who are in the habit of doing their own thinking to get it and read it.

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[The substance of an Address delivered before the South-Eastern Ohio Teach

ers' Association.]

The events of the past few years have demonstrated the importance of two subjects that have hitherto not received much direct attention in our schools : I mean morality and citizenship. The former has begun to attract a good degree of attention; the latter, while in a certain sense a part of it, is in itself not less essential and has for some unaccountable reason been strangely overlooked. Yet the reason is not wholly inexplicable; there seemed to be no need of such instruction. We know better now; though I fear few of us realize the urgency of the demand.

Teachers may well ask themselves whether it is possible to strive for a nobler purpose than to make good citizens of their pupils. Their efforts in this direction will not bring them into conflict with any religious creed or any political party.

No one will deny that patriotism is a prime virtue and that the sincere patriot is to be ranked among the noblest of men. But a man may be sincerely patriotic, if he is ignorantly so, his zeal to benefit his country is quite as likely to lead him to do her harm as good. What

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on chemistry, furnishing sufficient material for pretty thorough laboratory practice without requiring a large amount of costly apparatus.

A Practical Course for the Study of the German Language. By Rudolph Leonhart, A. M. Published by the author, at Canton, O. Price 50 cents.

Prof. Leonhart has been a life-long teacher of the German language, and out of his large experience he has prepared a book for beginners which is at once eminently practical and reasonably thorough. The "How I Was EducatedPapers. From the Forum Magazine. Paper

30 cents. D. Appleton & Co,, New York. In these papers, Edward E. Hale, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, F. A. P. Barnard, John H. Vincent, William T. Harris, S. C. Bartlett, J. R. Kendrick, Timothy Dwight, E. G. Robinson, James B. Angell, and Andrew D. White, each in his own way, tell the story of their education. Teachers and persons engaged in the work of their own education will find much to entertain and profit.

Harper and Brothers, New York, have issued a new and revised edition of Hooker's Child's Book of Nature, in three very neat little volumes, or bound together in one volume. The work is designed to aid mothers and teachers in training children to observe plants, animals and natural phenomena. These books in the hands of the children, under the direction of intelligent mothers, are of more value than all the spelling books in the universe.

Animal Life in the Sea and on the Land: A Zoology for Young People. By Sarah Cooper. New York: Harper and Brothers.

Starting with the lower forms of life, as the sponge, the author traces in simple and pleasing style a gradual development up to the highest. The aim is to lead young people to observe and study the animal kingdom, rather than to commit to memory facts stated in a book about animals. Animal structure and adaptation of structure to habits receive special attention. The book is profusely and finely illustrated. It is an excellent book for either school or home use.

The Science of Education. Designed as a Text-Book for Teachers. By Francis B. Palmer, Ph. D. Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati and New York.

This book will be widely read. It strikes out on new lines of thought. It is a book for thinkers, not for dreamers. The author undertakes to ground the art of methods on the science of the process of mental development apart from the science of psychology.

that to make the science of psychology the basis of the art of methods is like making the science of botany the basis of the art of farming. “The science of psychology is the science of mind in a developed state," but it surnishes no aid in determining the best means and methods of mental development. We have not time to form a final judgment in regard to this book, but we feel safe in advising those of our readers who are in the habit of doing their own thinking to get it and read it.

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