The Edinburgh Review, Volume 36; Volume 70

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A. and C. Black, 1840
 

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Page 320 - But the answer was that nothing could be done without the Nabob's orders, that the Nabob was asleep, and that he would be angry if anybody woke him.
Page 320 - ... they imagined that the soldiers were joking ; and, being in high spirits on account of the promise of the Nabob to spare their lives, they laughed and jested at the absurdity of the notion. They soon discovered their mistake. They expostulated ; they entreated ; but in vain. The guards threatened to cut down all who hesitated. The captives were driven into the cell at the point of the sword, and the door was instantly shut and locked upon them.
Page 106 - I scarcely ever met with a better companion ; he has inexhaustible spirits, infinite wit and humour, and a great deal of knowledge ; but a thorough profligate in principle as in practice, his life stained with every vice, and his conversation full of blasphemy and indecency. These morals he glories in for shame is a weakness he has long since surmounted.
Page 106 - He told us himself, that in this time of public dissension he was resolved to make his fortune.
Page 193 - ... unfeigned assent and consent as aforesaid, and subscribed the declaration aforesaid, and shall not take and subscribe the oath following : I, AB, do swear that it is not lawful upon any pretence whatsoever to take arms against the king...
Page 320 - ... servants of the Company at Madras had been forced by Dupleix to become statesmen and soldiers. Those in Bengal were still mere traders, and were terrified and bewildered by the approaching danger. The governor, who had heard much of Surajah Dowlah's cruelty, was frightened out of his wits, jumped into a boat, and took refuge in the nearest ship. The military commandant thought that he could not do better than follow so good an example. The fort was taken after a feeble resistance ; and great...
Page 544 - THE power of Armies is a visible thing, Formal, and circumscribed in time and space ; But who the limits of that power shall trace Which a brave People into light can bring Or hide, at will, for freedom combating By just revenge inflamed...
Page 313 - I have of the gentleman, he deserved and might expect from his conduct everything as it fell out : a man of an undaunted resolution, of a cool temper, and of a presence of mind which never left him in the greatest danger : born a soldier, for, without a military education of any sort, or much conversing with any of the profession, from his judgment and good sense, he led on an army like an experienced officer and a brave soldier, with a prudence that certainly warranted success.
Page 296 - Captain. It might have been expected, that every Englishman who takes any interest in any part of history would be curious to know how a handful of his countrymen, separated from their home by an immense ocean, subjugated, in the course of a few years, one of the greatest empires in the world. Yet, unless we greatly err, this subject is, to most readers, not only insipid but positively distasteful.
Page 318 - The great stream which fertilizes the soil is, at the same time, the chief highway of Eastern commerce. On its banks, and on those of its tributary waters, are the wealthiest marts, the most splendid capitals, and the most sacred shrines of India. The tyranny of man had for ages straggled in vain against the overflowing bounty of nature.

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