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EXPLANATION OF THE CHART.

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THE “MINIATURE CHART OF AMERICAN History," found on the two preceding pages, is a mere outline of a larger chart measuring about four feet by five and a half

. The design of the small chart is, principally, to furnish, by its convenience for reference, additional aid to those pupils who may be studying the outlines of the history from the larger one; for as the small chart wants the coloring of the other, and many of its important features, it will be found, separately, of comparatively little importance. A brief explanation of the Miniature Chart,” however, may, in this place, be useful.

The two divisions of the chart should be considered as brought together, so as to present the whole united on one sheet. The chart is arranged in the “downward course of time," from top to bottom, embracing a period of nearly 350 years, extending from the discovery of America by the Cabots, in 1497, to the year 1845. The dark shading, extending entirely across the chart at the top, represents all North America as occupied by the Indian tribes at the time of the discovery; and following the chart downwards, the gradually increasing light portions represent the gradual increase of European settlements. The darkest shading represents the country as unexplored by the whites;--the lighter shading as having been explored, but not settled. Thus, Vermont was the last settled of the New England States; Upper Canada was settled at a much later period, and some of the Western United States still later.

On the right is a column of English history; then a column of dates, corresponding with which the events are arranged on the chart from top to bottom; then follows the history of the present British Provinces north of the United States: then the histories of the several United States as their names are given at the bottom of the chart; after the territories, at the left, and adjoining Oregon, appcar Texas, Mexico, and Central America. The large chart, of which this is a very imperfect outline, gives the prominent features, in the histories of all the settled portions of North America.

The uility of well-arranged charts is very much the same as that of histori. cal maps. Although maps give the localities of events, they cannot give their sequences, or order of succession; but as the eye glances over the chart, and follows it downwards in the stream of time, there is presented to the mind, instead of one local fixed picture, a moving panorama of events. In the mar, the associations are fixed upon the proximity of locality ; in the chart, upon tho order of succession: and the two combined, in connection with the written history, give the most favorable associations possible for the attainment and retention of historical knowledge. One prominent advantage of the chart, however, soparately considered, is, that it presents at one view a Comparatiré History, of which books alone can give only a very inadequate idea, and that only to a well-disciplined memory of arbitrary associations. A view of the chart makes upon the mind as lasting an impression of the outlines of a country's history, as does the map of its topography, when the plans of both are equally understood ;

and the prominent features in a country's history may be recalled to the mind, after a study of the chart, with the same fucility that the geographical outlines may be recalled, after a study of the mop; for the principles upon which the mind acquires the knowledge, through the medium of the eye, are in both cases the same. The chart, the map, and the written history, should be used together; the chart, presenting at one view a comparative chronology of the events, being considered the frame-work of the structure; and the map, giving the localities, the basis upon which it stands.

BOOK I.

INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA,

AND

AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES.

“They waste us; ay, like April snow

In the warm noon, we shrink away;
And fast they follow as we go

Towards the setting day,
rill they shall fill the land, and we
Are driven into the western sea.”

BRYANT.

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