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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on ... Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either,....
" ... Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed,... "
The National Review - Page 374
1861
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A Brief Retrospect of the Eighteenth Century: Part the First in ..., Volume 2

Samuel Miller - 1805
...possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that no philologer could examine them all without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists. Thera is similar reason, though not quite so forcible, for supposing that both the Gothic and the Celtic,...
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The Classical Journal, Volume 6

1819
...anniversary discourse declares, respecting the languages, " that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have' sprung from some common source, which perhaps no longer exists." The Sanskrita was most probably the more ancient of the three, and as the Latin is but the ^Eolic dialect...
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The Youth's Companion: Or An Historical Dictionary; Consisting of Articles ...

Ezra Sampson - 1813 - 424 pages
...possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer could examine them all, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists." SARACENS, a people celebrated some centuries ago, who came from the deserts of Arabia. They proceeded...
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The Youth's Companion, Or, An Historical Dictionary: Consisting of Articles ...

Ezra Sampson - 1816 - 412 pages
...possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer could examine them all, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists." SARACENS, a people celebrated some centuries ago, who came from the desarts of Arabia. They proceeded...
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Bibliotheca ms. Stowensis: A descriptive catalogue of the manuscripts in the ...

Richard Temple Nugent Brydges Chandos Buckingham and Chandos (1st duke of) - 1819
...have been produced by accident ; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all " three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, DO " longer exists. There is a similar reason, though not quite so forcible, for supposing that both...
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The Antiquities of Free-masonry: Comprising Illustration of the Five Grand ...

1823 - 366 pages
...Jones, " bear so great a resemblance to each other, that no philologer could examine them all three without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which perhaps no longer exists."* * Asiat. Researches, vol. i. After the invention of letters, it would not be long before the difference...
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Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Volume 3

Dugald Stewart - 1827
...been produced by accident ; so strong, " indeed, that no philosopher could examine them all three, *' without believing them to have sprung from some common " source which perhaps no longer exists, "t The only possible supposition, I apprehend, on which all this can be explained, is, that Sanscrit...
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Researches Into the Origin and Affinity of the Principal Languages of Asia ...

Vans Kennedy - 1828 - 324 pages
...have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists." * It is, therefore, the structure of Sanscrit which so peculiarly distinguishes it from other languages,...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1828
...concord and government. No philologist acquainted with both languages, Sir W. Jones says, could help believing them ' to have sprung from ' some common source, which perhaps no longer exists.' It is not, however, in the language itself, so much as in the artificial forms and rules of its structure...
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the human mind ...

Dugald Stewart - 1829
...have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philosopher could examine them' all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source which perhaps no -longer exists." f The only possible supposition, I apprehend, on which all this can be explained, is, that Sanscrit...
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