The Harvard Classics, Volume 9

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Charles William Eliot
P. F. Collier & son, 1909

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Page 212 - Without a sign his sword the brave man draws, And asks no omen but his country's cause.
Page 308 - He had already sent his baggage on board ; for though he was not at that time...
Page 301 - Being got at a convenient distance from the houses, we stood still, in the midst of a most dangerous and dreadful scene. The chariots which we had ordered to be drawn out, were so agitated backwards and forwards, though upon the most level ground, that we could not keep them steady, even by supporting them with large ftones.
Page 298 - I am well assured will be rendered for ever illustrious. And notwithstanding he perished by a misfortune, which, as it involved at the same time a most beautiful country in ruins, and destroyed so many populous cities, seems to promise him an everlasting remembrance ; notwithstanding he has himself composed many and lasting works ; yet I am persuaded the mentioning of him in your immortal writings will greatly contribute to eternize his name.
Page 424 - I am unacquainted not only with the nature of their crimes, or the measure of their punishment, but how far it is proper to enter into an examination concerning them. Whether therefore any difference is usually made with respect to the ages of the guilty, or no distinction is to be observed between the young and the adult; whether...
Page 244 - ... this was his constant method, whatever book he read, for it was a maxim of his, ' that no book was so bad, but something might be learned from it.
Page 302 - Nothing then was to be heard but the shrieks of women, the screams of children, and the cries of men ; some calling for their children, others for their parents, others for their husbands, and only distinguishing each other by their voices ; one lamenting his own fate, another that of his family ; some wishing to die from the very fear of dying ; some lifting their hands to the gods ; but, the greater part imagining that the last and eternal night was come, which was to destroy the gods and the world...
Page 300 - The letter which, in compliance with your request, I wrote to you concerning the death of my uncle, has raised, it seems, your curiosity to know what terrors and dangers attended me while I continued at Misenum ; for there, I think, the account in my former broke off. 'Though my shock'd soul recoils, my tongue shall tell.
Page 302 - The ashes now began to fall upon us though in no great quantity. I turned my head, and observed behind us a thick smoke, which came rolling after us like a torrent. I proposed, while we...
Page 301 - Though it was now morning, the light was exceedingly faint and languid ; the buildings all around us tottered, and though we stood upon open ground, yet, as the place was narrow and confined, there was no remaining there without certain and great danger : we therefore resolved to quit the town.

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