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work, as it were, at a heat, to write down his thoughts, currente calamo, without difficulty, hesitation, or impediment. Perhaps this decision of the author, proceeding from his habit of previous reflection, and from his devotion to the cause of truth, gives to his writings that peculiar spirit which distinguishes them. His works intended for publication had, of course, the advantage of revision and correction; but as many of the following were extemporaneous thoughts committed hastily to paper, and never afterwards corrected, the reader will make allowance for any inaccuracies that he may find in them.

Some persons may think that too many, and others that too few, of the letters have been published; the great difficulty was to make a selection, and to show, without fatiguing the reader, the interest which was felt by Mr Locke on so many different questions, the versatility of his genius, and the variety of his occupations. Of the letters from different correspondents found amongst Mr Locke's papers, the whole of those from Sir Isaac Newton, and the greater part of those from Lord Shaftesbury and Lord Peterborough, are now printed. Of the remainder, nearly one hundred are from Limborch; perhaps double that number from Monsieur Toinard, containing the scientific news of Paris from 1679 for several years following; many from Le Clerc; from M. Guenelon, of Amsterdam ; from Lord Ashley, afterwards the third Earl of Shaftesbury; from Mr Tyrrell and Dr Thomas, Mr Clark of Chipstead, to whom the Thoughts on Education were addressed; and from A. Collins, &c. &c.; amounting altogether to some thousands in number. The desire of keeping this publication within reasonable bounds, has prevented the publication of more than a very few of these letters.

Ockham, April 24th, 1829.

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404

PAOL

Locke's answer

327

Species

328

Understanding—Arguments positive and negative. 1677

329

Essay concerning Recreation, in answer to D. G.'s desire. 1677 330

Memory-Imagination-Madness

333

Madness

Error

336

336

Space. 1677

Relation-Space. 1678

338

Adversaria Theologica

342

Trinitas-Non Trinitas

342

Christus Deus supremus-Christus non Deus supremus

344

Defence of Nonconformity

346

Additions intended by the author to have been made to the Essay

on Human Understanding

359

Abstract of the Essay

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APPENDIX.

Thomas Burnett to Mr Locke

400

David Thomas to Mr Locke

403

Letters from Limborch to Locke

NOTES ON DOMBSTIC AND FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

Petition of George Lord Murray

437

Sir R. Walpole's free discourse on Foreign Affairs

440

Curious proof of early hatred of George II. for his son Frederick

440

Spanish Projects

442

Hessian Treaty

445

Strange account given by the Duke of Ripperda of the Secret Treaty

of Vienna

447

The account of the death of George I. received by ministers in Eng-

land

448

Legal argument as to the King's taking the Test in Parliament 450

Sir R. Walpole's management at accession of George II.

453

Sir Spencer Compton loses his influence, and perceives it

453

Attempts of George II. to encroach on the Chancellor's Ecclesiastic

Patronage

454

Sensible conversation of Sir R. Walpole

456

Walpole's opinion that no good came of Cabinets

456

Negotiation with France to assist the German politics of George II. 458

Unfavourable picture of the Dutch Republic by the Earl of Chesterfield 465

Curious account of parties in Holland, and intrigue to appoint a

Stadtholder

466

Mark of jealousy between Walpole and Townshend

472

Conversation with Walpole

480

Management of George II. by Queen Caroline and Walpole

481

Secret of the Queen's management of her husband

481

THE LIFE AND LETTERS

ок

JOHN LOCKE.

JOHN LOCKE was born at Wrington, in Somersetshire, A. D. 1632; his father, Mr J. Locke, who was descended from the Lockes of Charton Court, in Dorsetshire, possessed a moderate landed property at Pensfold and Belluton, where he lived. He was a Captain in the Parliamentary army during the Civil Wars, and his fortune suffered so considerably in those times, that he left a smaller estate to his son than he himself bad inherited.

John Locke was the eldest of two sons, and was educated with great care by his father, of whom he always spoke with the greatest respect and affection. In the early part of his life, his father exacted the utmost respect from his son, but gradually treated him with less and less reserve, and, when grown up, lived with him on terms of the most entire friendship; so much so, that Locke mentioned the fact of his father having expressed his regret for giving way to his anger, and striking him once in his childhood, when he did not deserve it. In a letter to a friend, written in the latter part of his life, Locke thus expresses himself on the conduct of a father towards his son: 6 That which I have often blamed as an indiscreet and dangerous practice in many fathers, viz. to be very indulgent to their children whilst they are little, and as they come to ripe years to lay great restraint upon them, and live with greater reserve towards them, which usually produces an ill understanding between father and son, which cannot bút be of bad consequences; and I think fathers

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