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10 Lagu

GREENWICE
WOOLWIC6

CABBATİL LINE ORATIOM OB TILT, THAMES.

Staffordshire Patteries Prije.

THE EVILS

OF

SABBATH-BREAKING.

ESSAY ON THE TEMPORAL ADVANTAGES OF THE SABBATH

TO THE WORKING CLASSES.

S. WILLIAMS,

WORKING POTTER, LONGTON.

LONDON:

PARTRIDGE AND OAKEY, PATERNOSTER ROW.

" If thou turn away thy foot from the Sabbath, from doing the pleasure on my holy day; and call the Sabbath a delight; the holy of the Lord honourable; and sbalt bonour him, not doing thiue own ways, nor finding thine own pleasure, nor speaking thine own words; then shalt thou delight thyself in the Lord; and I will cause thee to ride upon the bigh places of the earth, and feed thee with the heritage of Jacob, thy father; for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it."-ISAIAH, Iviii. 13, 14.

“A Sabbath-breaking community is never a prosperous, happy community." -DR. SPRING.

Meaden, Printer, Cursitor Street, Chancery Lane.

PRE FACE.

The circumstance which led to the publication of this Essay are as follows; viz.

Towards the close of 1847, John Henderson, Esq., of Park, Glasgow, offered three prizes “On the Temporal Advantages of the Sabbath to the Working Classes,” to be written by working men: 1045 of this class of the people competed for these prizes. The Adjudicators, anxious to reward more than three Essayists, obtained the patronage of Her Majesty the Queen, His Royal Highness Prince Albert, and several of the nobility, clergy, and gentry throughout the kingdom, and were enabled to bestow supplemental prizes of five pounds each on nearly 100 other competitors. The author of this Essay was among that number, and received his prize from the hand of Lord Ashley, at Exeter Hall, on the occasion of the public adjudication of the prizes, last December.

The Rev. S. Fisher, B. A., of Shelton, having had this Essay allocated to him as the donor of a prize of £5, generously allowed the author to publish it himself, and he begs thus publicly to express his gratitude to his patron; while he hopes the book may tend to promote, in the Staffordshire Potteries, the great work for which he and others are ardently labouring—the hallowing of the Day of Sacred Rest.

The author humbly craves the indulgence of the public towards this his first attempt in essay writing. It is the production of but a few weeks' labour. He forwarded

it in single sheets to a friend, then residing in London, to write it out fairly for him. Not retaining a copy by him, he inadvertently ran into some unnecessary tautology of sentiment, which he would have corrected; but the ready kindness of the Publishers had placed it in the press before he was aware of their intention; and it therefore appears before the public just as it was written for competition.

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