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and irksome, so that I go to the writing table with reluctance. Retaining, however, my esteem and gratitude for those whose good will has been so kindly bestowed upon me, I acknowledge yours particularly, and tender you my best prayers for your health and prosperity.

MEMORANDUM OF JEFFERSON'S TAXABLE PROPERTY. A list of the taxable property of the subscriber in Albemarle, Mar., 1815.

5640 acres of land (including 400 acres on Hardware held jointly with Hudson and others)

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I side board with doors and drawers, mahogany..

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I manufacturing mill renting at 1280 D. @ 24 p. c.

I toll grist mill.....

I saw mill.

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TO WILLIAM SHORT.

MONTICELLO, May 15, 1815.

DEAR SIR,-Your favor of the third finds me just on my departure for Bedford, and I return to you, therefore, the paper you enclosed me, without delay. To the fact of the want of time I will further add that no person on earth would more willingly than myself do whatever was within my power to reward with the honors they have merited our naval heroes, for the respect which their heroism has procured for our country, and for the humiliations they have inflicted on an insulting, a vindictive, and causeless enemy. But I never had that sort of poetical fancy which qualifies for allegorical devices, mottoes, etc. Painters, poets, men of happy imagination can alone do these things with taste. I must, therefore, refer

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it back to you for some one who will do justice to the subject. The re-revolution of France furnishes an additional element of calculation for the problem of your return to France. Adversity may have taught Bonaparte moderation; but I apprehend that his temper and particular kink of insanity render him incapable of that. What a treat, indeed, would the conversation of Dupont be! He must totally despair for his country, as I do. A military despotism is now, I fear, fixed on it permanently. Among the victims of his return to power, I contemplate but one with pleasure; that is the Pope. The insult which he and the bigot of Spain have offered to the lights of the nineteenth century by the re-establishment of the Inquisition admits no forgiveness. How happily distant are we from the Bedlam of Europe. Affectionately adieu.

TO CHARLES W. PEALE.

MONTICELLO, June 13, 1815.

DEAR SIR,-In your favor of May 2 you ask my advice on the best mode of selling your Museum, on which, however, I really am not qualified to advise. This depends entirely on the genius and habits of those among whom you live, with which you are so much better acquainted. I wish first it may be disposed of the most to your advantage, and secondly that it may not be separated. If profit be regarded, the purchaser must keep it in

Philadelphia, where alone the number and taste of the inhabitants can ensure its maintenance. It will be yet some time (perhaps a month) before my workmen will be free to make the plough I shall send you. You will be at perfect liberty to use the form of the mouldboard, as all the world is, having never thought of monopolizing by patent any useful idea which happens to offer itself to me; and the permission to do this is doing a great deal more harm than good. There is a late instance in this State of a rascal going through every part of it, and swindling the mill-owners, under a patent of two years old only, out of 20,000 dollars for the use of winged-gudgeons which they have had in their mills for twenty years, every one preferring to pay ten dollars unjustly rather than be dragged into a Federal court, one, two, or three hundred miles distant.

I think the cornsheller you describe, with two cylinders, is exactly the one made in a neighboring county, where they are sold at twenty dollars. I propose to take some opportunity of seeing how it performs. The reason of the derangement of machines with wooden cylinders of any length is the springing of the timber, to which white oak has a peculiar disposition. For that reason we prefer pine as the least apt to spring. You once told me of what wood you made the bars of the pen-frame in the polygraph, as springing less than any other wood; and I have often wished to recollect it but cannot. We give up here the cleaning of clover

seed, because it comes up so much more certainly when sown in the husk; seven bushels of which is more easily obtained for the acre than the three pints of clean seed which the sowing-box requires. We use the machine you describe for crushing corncobs, and for which Oliver Evans has obtained a patent, although to my knowledge the same machine has been made by a smith in Georgetown these sixteen years for crushing plaster, and he made one for me twelve years ago, long before Evans's patent. The only difference is that he fixes his horizontally, and Evans vertically. Yet I chose to pay Evans's patent price for one rather than be involved in a lawsuit of two or three hundred dollars' cost. We are now afraid to use our ploughs, every part of which has been patented, although used ever since the fabulous days of Ceres. On the subject of the spinning jenny, which I so much prefer to the Arkwright machines, for simplicity, ease of repair, cheapness of material and work, your neighbor, Dr. Allison, of Burlington, has made a beautiful improvement by a very

simple addition for the
preparatory operation of
roving. These are much
the best machines for
family and country use.
For fulling in our families
we use the simplest thing
in the world.

VOL. XVIII-19

We make a bench of the widest

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