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" Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men,... "
The baptist Magazine - Page 111
1832
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The Congregational Magazine, Volume 15

1832
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...homely dialect— the dialect of plain working men — is perfectly sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we would so readily stake...
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The Methodist new connexion magazine and evangelical repository, Volume 82

1879
...terms of theology, which would puzzle the rudest peasant. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...which we would so readily stake the fame of the old uupolluted English language, no book which shows so well how rich that language is in its own proper...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1846 - 758 pages
...to •ay. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for erery ecause they are specimens of Walpole's manner. Everybody who reads his works with at plai» workingmen, was perfectly sufficient Thert is no book in our literature on which we could so...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight, Volume 1

Half hours - 1847
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...for subtle disquisition, for every purpose of th'e fact, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working men, was perfectly...
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The Riches of Bunyan: Selected from His Works for the American Tract Society

John Bunyan, Jeremiah Chaplin - 1850 - 488 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men, was sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we could BO readily stake...
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The Riches of Bunyan

John Bunyan - 1850 - 488 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men, was sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we could BO readily stake...
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The Riches of Bunyan

John Bunyan - 1850 - 488 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men, was sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we could so readily stake...
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The Harbinger, Or, New Magazine of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion

1859
...iron cage ; the house beautiful, &c. ; all are as well known to us as the sight of our own street. There is no book in our literature, on which we would so readily stake the fame of our unpolluted English language ; no book that shows so well how rich that language is in its own proper...
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English Literature of the Nineteenth Century ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1851 - 746 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain workingmen, was perfectly sufficient There is no book in our literature on which we could so readily...
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English Literature of the Nineteenth Century ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1851 - 746 pages
...more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificenee, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition,...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain workingmen, was perfectly sufficicnt. There is no book in our literature on which we could so readily...
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