God Matters

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A&C Black, 2005 M01 1 - 249 pages
Seldom have God matters been treated with such verve, sense, rigour and humour as in this collection of writings by Herbert McCabe. The book demonstrates the depth and clarity of his theology and philosophy of God, his appetite for controversy, both political and theological, as well as a traditional Catholic concern for prayer, liturgy, Mary and St Dominic. The articles, which range widely, and represent over twenty years of characterstically dominican enterprise, reveal a personality that is itslef clear evidence that God matters.

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The reviewer who begins "Very disappointing" clearly didn't understand the book at all. Indeed, McCabe gives powerful arguments on the very points that reviewer raises. He might like to know that Aquinas, long before Ockham, formulates a version of the razor, and indeed in the very context we are talking about. That is, he considers whether a solution like the one suggested by the reviewer might obtain, and gives clear reasons for rejecting it. That reviewer might want to actually read Aquinas, rather than going on what is quite clearly hearsay in recounting Aquinas' view.
McCabe's book is a brilliant collection of writings over a wide range of issues related to Christian life and belief. It begins with four extremely well-argued chapters exploring the doctrine of God and the problem of evil, and the later chapters include fascinating discussions on the Eucharist and Incarnation, as well as beautifully clear and exciting sermons on a range of topics.
 

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I think the previous reviewer is confused about which book he read. His comments surely don't apply to Herbert McCabe's 'God Matters'. McCabe (who did not call himself a Thomist, rather a student of Thomas Aquinas) considers in his first chapter the question, "Why is there anything, instead of nothing?" - and insists we don't know the answer. That's as close as he comes to what the reviewer seems to be saying.
The rest of the articles "range widely," as the summary says, over philosophy and theology. McCabe will be seen as one of the most important Catholic theologians of the 20th century, more accessible than Rahner and funnier than Gutierrez - to mention two other greats. An aspect of McCabe's work is continued by his student Terry Eagleton, perhaps the leading British academic critic, notably in his "Reason, Faith, and Revolution: Reflections on the God Debate" (Yale UP).
 

Contents

II
2
III
10
IV
25
V
39
VI
53
VII
54
VIII
62
IX
75
XIX
155
XX
165
XXI
181
XXII
182
XXIII
199
XXIV
209
XXV
210
XXVI
215

XII
76
XIII
90
XIV
101
XV
115
XVI
116
XVII
130
XVIII
146
XXVII
226
XXVIII
235
XXIX
238
XXX
243
XXXI
246
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About the author (2005)

Herbert McCabe was a Dominican Friar and theologian of outstanding originality who died in 2001. He was deeply influential on philosophers such as Anthony Kenny and Alasdair MacIntyre and poets and writers like Terry Eagleton and Seamus Heaney.

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