Page images
PDF
EPUB

THE

GENUINE WORKS

FLAVIUS JOSEPHUS,

Jewish Bistorian :

THE

CONTAINING

TWENTY BOOKS OF THE JEWISH ANTIQUITIES,

SEVEN BOOKS OF THE JEWISH WAR,

AND THE

LIFE OF JOSEPHUS,

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL GREEK, ACCORDING TO HAVERCAMP'S ACCURATE EDITION.

TOGETHER WITH

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS ;
PARALLEL TEXTS OF SCRIPTURE; THE TRUE CHRONOLOGY OF THE SEVERAL HISTORIES ; AN ACCOUNT OF THE JEWISH COINS,

WEIGHTS, AND MEASURES; AND A COMPLETE INDEX

BY THE LATE

WILLIAM WHISTON, M. A.

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, &c. &c.

A NEID EDITION.

REVISED, AND ILLUSTRATED WITH NOTES, BY THE

REV. SAMUEL BURDER, A.M.

of Clare Hall, Cambridge ; Lecturer of the United Parishes of Christ Church, Newgate Street, and St. Leonard, Foster Lane, London;

Author of Oriental Customs, &c. &c.

IN TWO VOLUMES,

VOL. II.

London:

J. ROBINS AND CO. ALBION PRESS, IVY-LANE, PATERNOSTER-ROW.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][ocr errors]

THE

ANTIQUITIES

OF

THE JEWS.

.

BOOK XVII.

Containing an Interval of Fourteen Years.

FROM THE DEATH OF ALEXANDER AND ARISTOBULUS, TO THE BANISHMENT OF

ARCHELAUS.

SLAUGHTER OF HIS BRETHREN; BUT INGRATIATES HIM-
SELF WITH THE ROMANS, BY. HIS LIBERAL PRESENTS,

thus

his father; being, indeed no other than a king CHAP. I.

already. And he was for that very reason ANTIPATER IS HATED BY ALL THE JEWISH Nation for the trusted, and the more firmly depended on, for

the which he ought to have been put to death :

as appearing to have betrayed his brethren ALSO CONCERNING HEROD's wives AND CHILDREN.

out of his concern for the preservation of He

ill , brethren, and had brought his father and, before them, to his father himself. Now into the highest degree of impiety, till he was all Antipater's contrivances tended to make haunted with furies for what he had done, his || his way to take off Herod, that he might have hopes did not succeed to his mind, as to the nobody to accuse him in the vile practices he rest of bis life. For, although he was deli-was devising; and that Herod might have no vered from the fear of his brethren being his refuge, nor any to afford him assistance : since rivals as to the government; yet did he find they must thereby have Antipater for their it a very hard thing, and almost impracticable, open enemy. Insomuch that the very plots he to come at the kingdom, because the hatred | laid against his brethren were occasioned by of the nation against him on that account was the hatred be bore his father. But at this time become so very great. And, besides this very he was more than ever set upon the execudisagreeable circumstance, the affair of the tion of his attempts against Herod : because, soldiery grieved him still more : who were | if he were once dead, the government would alienated from him : from which yet these now be firmly secured to him. But, if he were kings derived all the safety which they had, suffered to live any longer, he should be in whenever they found the nation desirous of danger upon a discovery of that wickedness innovation. And all thiş , danger was drawn of which he had been the contriver; and his upon him by his destruction of his brethren. father would of necessity become his enemy. However, he governed the nation jointly with And on this account it was that he became

very

4

ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS.

(BOOK XVII. very bountiful to his father's friends, and be- || estate, that there might be no dispute between stowed great sums on several of them, in them about it. order to surprise men with his good deeds, Now Herod brought up his sons' children and take off their hatred against him. * And with great care : for Alexander had two sons he sent great presents to his friends at Rome by Glaphyra; and Aristobolus had three sons particularly, to gain their good will: and and two daughters by Bernice, Salome's above all the rest to Saturninus, the president daughter. And as his friends were once with of Syria. He also hoped to gain the favor of him, he presented the children before them : Satureinas's brother, with the large presents and, deploring the hard fortune of his own he bestowed on him: as also he used the same sons, he prayed that no such ill fortune might art to Salome, the king's sister ; who had befall these who were their children : but that married one of Herod's chief friends. And, they might improve in virtue, and obtain when he counterfeited friendship to those with what they justly deserved, and might wake whom he conversed, he was very subtle in him amends for his care of their education, gaining their belief; and very cunning to He also caused them to be betrothed againsť hide his hatred against any that he really did they should come to the proper age of marhate. But he could not impose upon his aunt, riage : the elder of Alexander's sons to Phewho understood him of a long time, and was roras's daughter; and Antipater's daughter a woman not easily to be deluded : especially to Aristobulus's eldest son. He also allotted while she had already used all possible cau- one of Aristobulus's daughters to Antipater's tion in preventing his pernicious designs. son ; and Aristobulus's other daughter io HeAlthough Antipater's uncle, by the mother's rod, a son of his own; who was born to him side, was married to her daughter; and this by the higb-priest's daughter. For it is the, by his own connivance and management ; | ancient practice among us to have many wives while she had before been married to Aristo- at the same time. Now the king made these bulus, and while Salome's other daughter by espousals for the children out of commiseration that husband was married to the son of Cal. of them now they were fatherless : as endealeas : yet that marriage was no obstacle to voring to render Antipater kind to them. by her, who knew how wicked he was, in her these intermarriages. But Antipater did not discovering his designs: as her former kin-fail to bear the same temper of mind to his dred to him could not prevent her hatred of brothers' children, which he had borne to his bim. Now Herod bad compelled Salome, brothers themselves. And his father's concern while she was in love with Sylleus the Ara- || about them provoked his indignation against bian, to marry Alexas: which match was by them : upon this supposal, that they would her submitted to, at the instance of Julia : become greater than ever his brothers had who persuaded Salome not to refuse it, lest been : while Archelaus,a king, would support she should herself be their open enemy: since | his daughter's sons : and Pheroras, a tetrarch, Herod had swotn, that he would never be would accept of one of the daughters, as a friends with Salome, if she would not ac- || wife to his son. What provoked him also cept of Alexas for her husband. So she sub- was this : that all the multitude would so mitted to Julia, as being Cæsar's wife: and commiserate these fatherless children, and so besides that, as she advised her to nothing | bate him for making them fatherless; that all but what was very much for her own advan-would come out: since they were no strangers tage: At this time also it was that Herod to his vile disposition towards his brethren. sent back king Archelaus's daughter, who had He contrived, therefore, to overturn his father's been Alexander's wife, to her father : return-settlements ; as thinking it a terrible thing ing the portion he had with her, out of his own that they should be so related to him, and be

wawancar * Liberality may flow, it clearly appears from this to varnish a bad charactef, or to retrieve lost reputation. instance, from various motives. It discovers a refine- || The preservation of it by continued integrity would be nient in hypocrisy to endeavor, by such bribes as these, much easier, as well as more honorable. Ď.

SO

« PreviousContinue »