One Hundred Modern Scottish Poets: With Biographical and Critical Notices

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Edwards, 1881
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Page 426 - So here hath been dawning Another blue Day : Think wilt thou let it Slip useless away. Out of Eternity This new Day is born ; Into Eternity, At night, will return. Behold it aforetime No eye ever did : So soon it forever From all eyes is hid. Here hath been dawning Another blue Day : Think wilt thou let it Slip useless away.
Page 235 - Conquer in this !" When, by thy fever'd bed, Thou see'st the dark-wing' d angel take his stand, Who soon shall lay thy body with the dead, And bear thy spirit to the spirit's land : Fear not ! the cross sustains thee, and its aid In that last trial shall thy succour bring ; Go fearless through...
Page 425 - THE SOWER'S SONG. NOW hands to seed-sheet, boys, We step and we cast ; old Time's on wing ; And would ye partake of Harvest's joys, The corn must be sown in Spring. Fall gently and still, good corn, Lie warm in thy earthy bed; And stand so yellow some morn, For beast and man must be fed.
Page 113 - A deer with a neck that was longer by half Than the rest of its family's (try not to laugh), By stretching and stretching, became a Giraffe, Which nobody can deny. A very tall pig, with a very long nose, Sends forth a proboscis quite down to his toes ; And he then by the name of an Elephant goes, Which nobody can deny.
Page 29 - For ilka blade o' grass keps its ain drap o' dew. Gin reft frae friends or crest in love, as whiles nae doubt ye've been, Grief lies deep hidden in your heart or tears flow frae your een, Believe it for the best, and trow there's good in store for you, For ilka blade o' grass keps its ain drap o
Page 425 - THE SOWER'S SONG. Now hands to seed-sheet, boys! We step and we cast; old Time's on wing; And would we partake of harvest's Joys, The corn must be sown In spring. Fall gently and still, good corn, Lie warm in thy earthy bed ; And stand so yellow some morn, For beast and man must be fed.
Page 235 - That pure arch seems to be, And as I bless its mystic light, My spirit turns to thee. Thus, gleaming o'er a guilty world, We hail the ray of love ; Thus dawns upon the contrite soul Thy mercy from above ; And as Thy faithful promise speaks Repentant sin forgiven, In humble hope we bless the beam That points the way to Heaven.
Page 28 - He's thinkin' upon naething, like mony mighty men ; A wee thing maks us think, a sma' thing maks us stare, There are mair folk than him biggin' castles in the air. Sic a night in winter may weel mak...
Page 316 - Th' uncertain vista ends. How best to bear each various change, Should weal or woe befall, To love, live, die, this Sacred Book, Lydia, it tells us all. " O, much-beloved, our coming day To us is all unknown ; But sure we stand a broader mark Than they who stand alone. One knows it all : not His an eye, Like ours, obscured and dim; And, knowing us, He gives this book, That we may know of Him. " His words, my love, are gracious words.
Page 213 - Silence guards the coast, ere thrill her everlasting bars. No sun here shines on wanton isles ; but o'er the burning sheet A rim of restless halo shakes, which marks the internal heat, As, in the days of beauteous earth, we see with dazzled sight The red and setting sun o'erflow with rings of welling light. Oh ! here in dread abeyance lurks of uncreated things The last lake of God's wrath, where He His first great enemy brings. Deep in the bosom of the gulf the fiend was made to stay, Till, as it...

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