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ENGLISH.

lame
"a tear, weeping
“ to rot”
brass
ache
entrails

murua

summit “ to grow" fruitful muscle winter

BASQUE.

ACKNOWLEDGED CELTIC. maquia

cymhercyn, W.“ lame.” [malcoa] negarra deigr, deigryn, W."a tear, weeping." marriatu

malldod, W. "to rot." menasta

umha, G.“ brass." mina, somina

gwynio, W. v.“ to ache.” mora, moraga

mionach, G. ymysgareodd, W.“en

trails.”

mullach, G. "summit.” nagusta

chwanegu, W." to grow.”

cnydfawr, W.“ fruitful.” nasarquia

cyhir, W.; muscle.” neguu

gauaf, W. geamhradh, G.“winter." nerabea

beag, G. "little," cf. bean, Irish,

* young woman." * Mr. Gladstone, in his “ Juventus Mundi," quotes banna as a local Greek word for “woman, girl," allied to Hebrew banah, “ daughter."

naroa

young

osquea, oskia

shoe
" to steal”
cold
forest, wild

oyana, basoa*

bite multitude

ахе

esgid, W. "shoe." osta

ysgipio, W." to steal.”
otza

oer, W." cold.”
coedwyn, W. coiltean, G. “ forest."

fasach, G. bwyst, W. "wild.” ozcatu

hocedydd, W.“ bite." oztea

lluaws, W."multitude." puda

tuagh, G. "axe.”

safnaid, W. cabastair, G. “ bit.” quaratsa, kiratza goirt, G. chwerw, W. “ bitter." quea, guea

cf. geirw, goirt, garwffon, W., geur,

G.“rough."
quemena

ymegnio, W. "endeavour."
agwedd, amnaid, W. car, caodagh, G.

“wink, gesture.”
Here, again, the Basque syllables are shared by W. and G.

pusca, zatia

bit bitter hairy

endeavour

gesture, wink

quenua, keinua

* This " basoa" is the word that W. Von Humboldt accredits with the origin of “Basque."

ENGLISH.

ACKNOWLEDGED CELTIC.

belly plantation

son

semea

sound

cover

stale bald back

pasture

$. V.

witness
“ to push "
flake
little
spittle
yellow, pale

BASQUE. sabela

bola, W. bolg, G. " belly." sabia, sarbia

suidheachadh, G.“ plantation.”

cf. meac, G.“ son." * This looks to me like the Latin semen = seed, possibly allied to the Teutonic son, from Sanscrit sunu, “to beget." sendoa

sain, W. slan, G. " sound.” segala

clawr, W. ceil, G. “ cover." singlea

sean, G. hen, W. “stale." soilla

moel, W. sgailceach, G.“ bald." soina

cefn, W. “ back.”
soloa, soroa, cf. also, dol, W. lon, G. "pasture."

“ larrea
talazta

tystiolaethu, W.“ witness." talcatu

cf. staile, G. " a thump." tela

tafell, W. tlam, G, “flake.” tipia, chiquia

tipyn, W. ychydyd, W.“ little.” tua

poer, W."spittle.” ubela

buidhe, G. gwelu, melyn, W."yellow,

pale.” ucabilla, ucaraya

llaw, W. lamh, G. "hand.” ucalondoa, ucondoa elyn, W. uileann, G.“ elbow." ucha

blwch, W.“ box.” ucitu

cyfranu, W. "to divide." ucordea

llawes, W. muilicheann, G. "sleeve.” ucatu

gwadu, W. aicheadh, G.“ to deny." uija

pyg, W. bigh, G. "pitch."
untzia, ontzia

long, G. llong, W."ship.”
dur, W. "water," cf. “ean," French,

fist, hand
elbow
box
“ to divide"
sleeve
" to deny”
pitch
ship
water

ura

“aqua,” Latin. uria

rioghachd G."state;" Ger, stadt. òr, G. aur, W. "gold;" cf. Latin

town gold

urred

aurum.

scanty, poor

urria, churra

gearr, G. cwta, rheidus, W."scanty,

poor.” ysguthan, W. "ringdove or wood

pigeon,”

dove, pigeon

usoa

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BASQUE.

ACKNOWLEDGED CELTIC. uste

dysgleiro, W." to shine." uzcaldu

clymu, W.“ to bind.” This word bears some resemblance to the local word, Escaldunac, or Euscaldunac, which, if derived from “uzcaldu," will be found identical with the Welsh, Cymru, Cymraeg, &c. uzta

cf. ysgythru, W.“ to crop,” the root

of this word is in ysgyfarn, "ear.” yelosgotu

efelychu, W. ymrysongar, W. "emu

lation, to contend." yotorra

ateb, W.“echo,” [b = rr]. zabala

pell, W. falbh, G.“ far, distant." zabarra

araf, W." slow." zailla

laidir, G. caled, galluog, W.“hard,

strong."
zaitzallea, zaitzaria gwyliwr, W.“watchman.”
arzaya [from ardia, aodhair, G.“ shepherd.”

sheep]
zaina

gwythen, W. “ vein." zamaria, zama march, W." horse;" cf. each, G. & I.

“ horse." The Welsh have also the word ceffyl, for “ horse ; cf. Spanish caballo, Latin caballus. [zanzoa) eyagora gaoir, G. "cry, clamour.” Zaralea, zuhaina cyflwr, gwrthlain, W." case, lining." zarea, sasquia bascaid, G. basged, W. “ basket.” zarica, iuncia

helygen, W. “willow;" cf. salix,

Latin, "the sallow." Note.—The Latin 8 is convertible into the Welsh h, as in the analogous case of “salt;" and Latin l into Basque r. zartatu, zarteguin stairn, G. “ crash, a sudden noise."

arsaidh, G.“old.” zauria

archoll, W., gearradh, G.“wound.” zocorra, soquilla sgrath, G.; tywarchen, W.; priddell,

W. “clod.”

vein horse

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cry, clamour case, lining basket willow

zar

“ to burst, to crash”
old
wound
clod

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* It is requested that readers, having a special knowledge of the subjects discussed in these papers, will kindly communicate their views of the results arrived at to the writer ; all letters to be addressed to the printers' care.

London : Printed by NELSON & CO., Oxford Arms Passage, St. Paul's, London.

May 1, 1870.

PRICE 2d.

The Devil Fish

A NOVELIST'S VIEW OF NATURE.

VICTOR Hugo, a writer of world-wide fame, has introduced a most graphic incident into the Travailleurs de la Mer, describing, in highlywrought language, the encounter of his hero Gilliatt with a huge polyp, when groping in the water, half clad, about the entrance to a sea grotto among the Channel Islands. The narrative will be found in part II. book 4, chapters 1-3, of the English translation = "Toilers of the Sea." From its first publication, this incident has been regarded, more or less, as pure fiction-a license of imagination on the part of a professional novelist, a trick of trade to stimulate the reader's wonder, and excite an interest in the tale. As such it has been a favourite stock-piece, serving to show how far probabilities may be outraged; turning up, as often as the sea serpent puts in its frequent appearances before the public, to remind people that the eye of wonder sees more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in the philosophy of common sense. Then comes the trite illustration : “See what a fertile imagination can do in Victor Hugo's description of Gilliatt's encounter with the devil-fish ; " and we are further warned not again to be deluded by such cunninglydevised fables; for the whole thing is a myth. And yet the Devilfish is no fable.

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