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53431

DUPLICATE PASSAGES IN THE

OLD TESTAMENT

THEIR BEARING ON THE TEXT AND COMPILATION

OF THE HEBREW SCRIPTURES

ARRANGED AND ANNOTATED BY

ROBERT BY GIRDLESTONE, M.A.

Honorary Canon of Christ Church, and formerly Principal of Wycliffe Hall,

Author of 'The Foundations of the Bible'
* Doctor Doctorum,' 'Synonyms of the Old Testament,' etc.

Oxford
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

Oxford

PRINTED AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

BY HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

INTRODUCTION

§ 1. Nature and Object of the Work. § 2. State of our Present Hebrew Text. § 3. Method of Compilation. 4. Historical Authorities referred to or used in the Books of Kings and Chronicles. 5. On the Tendency of Hebrew Writers to quote from their contemporaries and Predecessors, and on Modes of Quotation. $ 6. The Bearing of the Present Work on Higher Criticism. $ 7. Specimens of the Grammatical and Idiomatic Changes to be found on comparing A. and B.

§ 1. Nature and Object of the Work. EVERY student of the Bible is aware that there is a great deal of historical matter common to the Books of Samuel and Kings on the one hand and to the Chronicles on the other. In the following pages this common matter is printed in parallel columns, the left column giving the earlier document contained in Samuel and Kings, and here for convenience called A., and the right column exhibiting the work of the Chronicler, here called B.

A careful examination of the parallel histories brings out the fact that there is not only a substantial agreement but also a textual relationship between the two records ; in fact, either the second is in certain parts an extract from the first, or else both works have been compiled from a common source. The former of these alternatives seems the more reasonable unless formidable objections can be produced against it, for the construction of imaginary documents generally means the creation of fresh difficulties.

A further and more exact collation of the common matter contained in our present Hebrew texts leads to the conclusion that there are numerous additions, omissions, and variations, in B. as compared with A.

Some of the variations are simply matters of spelling. Others are of the nature of dialectal changes, whether verbal or grammatical ; and they thus present us with distinctions either

6=19-39

Recl. mir,

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