The Poetical Works of Matthew Prior, Volume 2

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W. Pickering, 1835

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Page 93 - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time : also he hath set the world in their heart; so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
Page 92 - I know that, whatsoever God doeth, it shall be for ever: nothing can be put to it, nor any thing taken from it: and God doeth it, that men should fear before him.
Page 120 - For there is no remembrance of the wise more than of the fool for ever; seeing that which now is in the days to come shall all be forgotten. And how dieth the wise man ? as the fool.
Page 155 - All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Page 22 - She builds our quiet as she forms our lives; Lays the rough paths of peevish nature even, And opens in each heart a little heaven.
Page 217 - He strove to make interest and freedom agree ; In public employments industrious and grave, And alone with his friends, Lord ! how merry was he. Now in equipage stately, now humbly on foot, Both fortunes he tried, but to neither would trust ; And whirl'd in the round as the wheel turn'd about, He found riches had wings, and knew man was but dust.
Page 155 - ... or ever the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the pitcher be broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistern. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was : and the spirit shall return unto GOD Who gave it.
Page 93 - And further, by these, my son, be admonished : of making many books there is no end ; and much study is a weariness of the flesh.
Page 92 - And he spake three thousand proverbs: and his songs were a thousand and five. And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he epake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Page 209 - Lords, knights, and squires, the numerous band That wear the fair Miss Mary's fetters, Were summoned by her high command To show their passions by their letters. My pen amongst the rest I took, Lest those bright eyes that cannot read Should dart their kindling fires, and look The power they have to be obeyed.

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