The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature, Volume 25

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W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1768
Each number includes a classified "Monthly catalogue."
 

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Page 368 - See the grisly texture grow, ("Tis of human entrails made,) And the weights, that play below, Each a gasping warrior's head. Shafts for shuttles, dipt in gore, Shoot the trembling cords along Sword, that once a Monarch bore, Keep the tissue close and strong.
Page 255 - Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold king Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart.
Page 369 - Eirin weep, Ne'er again his likeness see ; Long her strains in sorrow steep, Strains of immortality ! Horror covers all the heath, Clouds of carnage blot the sun. Sisters, weave the web of death ; Sisters, cease ; the work is done.
Page 248 - I must tell you a great piece of refinement of Harley. He charged me to come to him often ; I told him I was loth to trouble him in so much business as he had, and desired I might have leave to come at his levee ; which he immediately refused, and said, That was not a place for friends to come to.
Page 58 - Scotland in 1633," says Walpole, "the magistrates of Edinburgh, knowing his majesty's taste, employed Jamesone to make drawings of the Scottish monarchs ; with which the king was so much pleased, that, inquiring for the painter, he sat to him, and rewarded him with a diamond ring from his own finger.
Page 243 - I am already represented to Harley as a discontented person, that was used ill for not being Whig enough ; and I hope for good usage from him. The Tories dryly tell me, I may make my fortune, if I please ; but I do not understand them, or rather, I do understand them.
Page 335 - Which ever way we looked, a scene of horror presented itself: on one side, the wreck (in which was all that we had in the world to support and subsist us), together with a boisterous sea...
Page 334 - ... stove in the heads of casks of brandy and wine, as they were borne up to the hatch-ways, and got so drunk, that some of them were drowned on board, and lay floating about the decks for some days after.
Page 296 - ... horses of former ages; and if there be any improvement in the species it is owing to our manner of breeding and training them. But a man at this time, who has been tolerably well educated in an improved Christian country, is a being possessed of much greater power to be, and to make happy, than a person of the same age, in the same or any other country some centuries ago. And for this reason I make no doubt that a person some centuries hence will, at the same age, be as much superior to us.
Page 334 - I was there the ship thumped with such violence, and the water came in so fast, that I was forced to get upon the quarter-deck again, without saving a single rag but what was upon my back' The boatswain and some of the people would not leave the ship so long as there was any liquor to be got at ; upon which Captain Cheap suffered himself to be helped out of his bed, put into the boat and carried on shore. It is natural to think...

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