Botano-theology, an arranged compendium [by J. S. Duncan.].

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Page 98 - I call heaven and earth to record this day against you, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing : therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live...
Page 101 - Let the field be joyful, and all that is therein : Then shall all the trees of the wood rejoice Before the LORD : for HE cometh, For HE cometh to judge the earth : HE shall judge the world with righteousness, And the people with his truth.
Page 99 - For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off. It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it? Neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go over the sea for us, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it?
Page 34 - Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 36 - On the barren flank of a rock grows a tree with coriaceous and dry leaves. Its large woody roots can scarcely penetrate into the stone. For several months of the year not a single shower moistens its foliage. Its branches appear dead and dried; but when the trunk is pierced there flows from it a sweet and nourishing milk. It is at the rising of the sun that this vegetable fountain is most abundant.
Page 96 - ... her sustenance. A banian tree, with many trunks, forms the most beautiful walks, vistas, and cool recesses, that can be imagined. The leaves are large, soft, and of a lively green ; the fruit is a small fig, when ripe of a bright scarlet ; affording sustenance to monkeys, squirrels, peacocks, and birds of various kinds, which dwell among the branches. The Hindoos are peculiarly fond of...
Page 96 - ... thousand feet in circumference, measured round the principal stems ; the overhanging branches, not yet struck down, cover a much larger space ; and under it grow a number of custard-apple and other fruit trees.

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