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Books Books 1 - 10 of 13 on Therefore, a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against....
" Therefore, a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. If men were all good, this precept would not be a good one; but as they are bad, and... "
The Great Illusion: A Study of the Relation of Military Power in Nations to ... - Page 43
by Norman Angell - 1911 - 407 pages
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Education, Volume 44

1924
...of whatever kind, and resort to any deceit to execute its will. "A prudent ruler," said Machiavelli, "ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons that made him bind himself no longer exist". This, in general is the...
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A Society of States: Sovereignty, Independence and Equality in a League of ...

William Teulon Swan Stallybrass - 1919 - 243 pages
...highest moral duty of a State is to maintain its power.6 . . . The State is the supreme human 4 So Machiavelli: "A prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist " (The Prince, ch. 18)....
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A Society of States: Sovereignty, Independence and Equality in a League of ...

William Teulon Swan Stallybrass - 1919 - 243 pages
...highest moral duty of a State is to maintain its power. 6 . . . The State is the supreme human 4 So Machiavelli: "A prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist" (The Prince, ch. 18). Hence...
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The Forum, Volume 36

1904
...found its inspiration in the advice given by Machiavelli, who lays down the precious doctrine that " a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. Nor are legitimate grounds...
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The Dramatist and the Received Idea

...almost axiomatic, is for Shakespeare neither natural nor logical. I can illustrate, conveniently, from Machiavelli: a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. If men were all good, this...
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Shutdown at Youngstown: Public Policy for Mass Unemployment

Terry F. Buss, F. Stevens Redburn - 1983 - 219 pages
...Valley'," 1978). 5. By Machiavellian, we mean acting exclusively out of self-interest. According to Machiavelli, "A prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing, it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him lend himself no longer exist." (The Prince: Chapter 18)...
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The Italian Renaissance

Renaissance Society of America - 1993 - 184 pages
...and a lion to frighten wolves. Those that wish to be only lions do not understand this. Therefore, a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. If men were all good, this...
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Magisterial Imagination: Six Masters of the Human Sciences

Max Lerner - 1994 - 219 pages
...for the lion cannot protect himself from traps, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. ... A prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. ... It is not, therefore,...
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Handbook of Organized Crime in the United States

Robert J. Kelly, Ko-lin Chin, Rufus Schatzberg - 1994 - 542 pages
...among members of the contracting population."106 The Machiavellian remedy is preemptive opportunism: "A prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist."107 But Williamson suggests...
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Political Style: The Artistry of Power

Robert Hariman - 2010 - 267 pages
...principle of the ruler's thinking by emphasizing the necessity of concealing one's motives. "Therefore, a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest" (p. 64). His argument here extends across the eighteenth chapter: Speech itself is naturally...
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