The Complete Practical Farmer: Being a Plain and Familiar Treatise on the Culture of the Soil, the Orchard, and the Garden; the Rearing, Breeding, and Management of Every Description of Live Stock, the Diseases to which They are Subject, and the Remedies; Directions for the Management of the Dairy; a Description of the Most Useful Implements of Husbandry; and Every Information Necessary to the Practical Agriculturist. Also an Index, by which Any Subject Can be Instantaneously Referred To. In Three Parts: Part III. on Live Stock, Under the Immediate Supervision of R.H. Budd ...

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Van Vleck and Davenport, 1835 - 508 pages
 

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Page 340 - ... spare about the neck and shoulders, and low in the withers, he will materially improve by remaining uncut another six months ; but if his fore-quarters are fairly developed at the age of a twelvemonth, the operation should not be delayed, lest he become heavy and gross before, and perhaps has begun too decidedly to have a will of his own. No specific age, then, can be fixed ; but the castration should be performed rather late in the spring or early in the autumn, when the air is temperate, and...
Page 360 - The pulse, however, and the symptoms of the case collectively, will form a better criterion than any change in the blood. Twenty-four hours after the operation, the edges of the wound will have united, and the pin should be withdrawn. When the bleeding is to be repeated, if more than three or four hours have elapsed, it will be better to make a fresh incision rather than to open the old wound.
Page 360 - Round this a little tow, or a few hairs from the mane of the horse, should be wrapped, so as to cover the whole of the incision ; and the head of the horse should be tied up for several hours, to prevent his rubbing the part against the manger. In bringing the edges of the wound together, and introducing the pin, care should be taken not to draw the skin, too much from the neck, otherwise blood will insinuate itself between it and the muscles beneath, and cause an unsightly and sometimes troublesome...
Page 393 - These should be as nearly as possible of the same sort, coming from a similar pasturage and climate, but possessing no relationship, or at most a very distant one, to the stock to which he is introduced.
Page 337 - ... should be always kind and gentle. There is no fault for which a breeder should so invariably discharge his servant as cruelty, or even harshness, towards the rising stock ; for the principle on which their after usefulness is founded, is early attachment to, and confidence in man, and obedience, implicit obedience, resulting principally from this.
Page 489 - On hatching there is not often any necessity for taking away the brood, barring accidents ; and having hatched, let the duck retain her young upon the nest her own time. On her moving with her brood, prepare a coop upon the short grass, if the weather be fine, or under shelter, if otherwise...
Page 366 - ... about. In the space of an hour or two, either the spasms begin to relax, and the remissions are of longer duration, or the torture is augmented at every paroxysm ; the intervals of ease are fewer and less marked, and inflammation and death supervene.
Page 25 - ... extends over the whole of the bottom of the pit, or kiln. I put on roots of trees or any rubbish wood, till there be a good thickness of strong coals. I then put on the driest of the clods that I have ploughed up round about so as to cover all the fire over. The earth thus put in will burn. You will see the smoke coming out at little places here and there. Put more clods wherever the smoke appears.
Page 360 - ... prevent his rubbing the part against the manger. In bringing the edges of the wound together, and introducing the pin, care should be taken not to draw the skin too much from the neck, otherwise blood will insinuate itself between it and the muscles beneath, and cause an unsightly and sometimes troublesome swelling. The blood should be received into a vessel, the dimensions of which are exactly known, so that the operator may be able to calculate at every period of the bleeding the quantity that...
Page 339 - If the horse is designed either for the carriage or for heavy draught, the farmer should not think of castrating him until he is at least a twelvemonth old; and, even then, the colt should be carefully examined. If he is thin and spare about the neck and shoulders, and low in the withers, he will materially improve by remaining uncut another six months; but if his fore-quarters are fairly developed at the age of...

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