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ANCIENT GREECE, INCLUDING EPIRUS AND).

THESSALIA.

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bay called Melas, and having come to the river Melas, whose stream did not suffice for the army, but failed-having crossed this river, from which the bay derives its name, they marched westward, passing by Ænos, an Æolian city, and the lake Stentoris, until they reached Doriscus. Doriscus is a shore and extensive plain of Thrace. Through it flows a large river, the Hebrus. On it a royal fort had been built, the same that is now called Doriscus, and a Persian garrison had been established in it by Darius from the time that he marched against the Scythians. This place, therefore, appeared to Xerxes to be convenient for reviewing and numbering his army; this he accordingly did. All the ships, therefore, having arrived at Doriscus, the captains, at the command of Xerxes, brought them to the shore adjoining Doriscus. On this coast stood Sala, a Samothracian city, and Zona; and at its extremity Serrhium, a celebrated promontory: this region formerly belonged to the Ciconians. Having steered to this shore, they hauled up the ships and repaired them; and in the meantime Xerxes numbered his army at Doriscus. How great a number of men each contributed, I am unable to say with certainty; for it is not mentioned by any one; but the amount of the whole land forces was found to be seventeen hundred thousand. They were computed in this manner: Having drawn together ten thousand men in one place, and having crowded them as close together as it was possible, they traced a circle on the outside; and having traced it, and removed the ten thousand, they threw up a stone fence on the circle, reaching to the height of a man's navel. Having done this, they made others enter within the inclosed space, until they had in this manner computed all; and having numbered them, they drew out according to nations.

Those who served in this expedition were the following: The Persians, equipped as follows: on their heads they wore loose coverings, called tiaras; on the body various coloured sleeved breastplates, with iron scales like those of fish; and on their legs, loose trousers; and instead of shields, bucklers made of osiers; and under them their quivers were hung. They had short spears, long bows, and arrows made of cane; and, besides, daggers suspended from the girdle on the right thigh. They had for their general Otanes, father of Amestris, wife of Xerxes, They were formerly called Cephenes by the Grecians, but by themselves and neighbours Artæans; but when Perseus, son of Danae and Jupiter, came to Cepheus, son of Belus, and married his daughter Andromeda, he had a son to whom he gave the name of Perses; and him he left

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