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felves all in quiet, we cou'd hardly believe " that we were deliver'd. We rose up early

to see if it cou'd be true, that our Delive"rance was real. Oh! Pardon us that we

have not first visited our Churches, the Mo' numents of Thy Mercy, which Thou hast

so graciously continu'd to us during all these Troubles, and been so gracious to us in them; and having taken them away so

little a while, dost now so speedily restore ' them to us. Oh! Pardon us that we can

pass by so great a Mercy! That we can meet ' in Councils and in Courts, and fill the ' Streets with our Crowds, and leave these Monuments of thy goodness neglected, as if some lnchanted Force kept their doors against "us. Oh! Pardon us, good Lord, and let not

this Sin redound upon all of us, whom thou

haft deliver'd. For is not this to fly on the spoil, and eat the Flesh with the Blood? (1 Sam. "14. 32.) When without fanctifying our Vi. • chory, without paying onr Homage to thee • for it, before Thy Altars, we rụn so greedi' ly upon enjoying the Fruits of it, and that

in a tumultuous and Injurious manner, to o those whoni Thou hast put in our Power..

Soon after this I find him lamenting the decay of Piety, and prevalency of Vice; These were always matter of grief and indignation to his Mind ; But chiefly after our great Deliverance, when the vilelt Ingratitude was à new Aggravation of every Sin. His sense of these things the following Meditation will fhew ; written Angust 17, 1690.;;: ::

• How

How do I fear that the Standard of Piety ' is lost in the World, and of that Holiness

without which no Man Mall see the Lord? I • know Christ will uphold his Church, and ' the Holy Spirit will be with it in every • Age to the end. And therefore even in ' this Age, he has his faithful Servants. But

I fear they are so few, and the number of o'thers so great ; that either they are not ta"ken notice of in the Croud ; or that people ' are so hardned and blinded, that seeing " they do not see, and hearing they will not (understand ; but choose rather to look up

on these as Men of unnecessary Severities, than such as keep up the Model of the Gorpel. By this means we in this Generation

may well be all Pygmies in Grace and hard"ly any of us come up to the measure of the Sta. 'ture of Fofus Chrift; but measuring our felves

by one another, may think our selves proper Christians. Where do we fee Piety

practic'd in all its parts, Private, Domestick, land Publick? Some few that are much con'versant in good Books, and Primitive Aco

counts of things, may have an Idea of Christianity, beyond what this Age cou'd give them : But then how easie is it for the cor

ruption of the Age we live in; to make this • be forgotten,or hinder it from being brought

down to Practice? Piety is rarely learn'd wholly by Books, we need continual Exam' ples, and the conversation of good People, s to bring these Notions into Practice. The reason of this seems to be, that Piety always

F 2

always selves all in quiet, we cou'd hardly believe " that we were deliver'd. We rose up early " to see if it cou'd be true, that our Delive"rance was real. Oh! Pardon us that we

have not first visited our Churches, the Mo' numents of Thy Mercy, which Thou hast

so graciously continu'd to us during all

these Troubles, and been so gracious to us ' in them; and having taken them away so "little a while, dost now so speedily restore ' them to us. Oh! Pardon us that we can • pass by fo great a Mercy! That we can meet

in Councils and in Courts, and fill the 'Streets with our Crowds, and leave these • Monuments of thy goodness neglected, as if

some Inchanted Force kept their doors against ' us. Oh! Pardon us, good Lord, and let not " this Sin redound upon all of us, whom thou ' hast deliver'd. For is not this to fly on the · Spoil, and eat the Flesls with the Blood? (1 Sam.

14. 32.) When without fanctifying our Vi. cctory, without paying onr Homage to thee ' for it, before Thy Altars, we run so greedi

ly upon enjoying the Fruits of it; and that in a tumultuous and Injurious manner, to 6 those whom Thou hast put in our Power. . : Soon after this I find him lamenting the decay of Piety, and prevalency of Vice; These were always matter of grief and indignation to his Mind ; But chiefly after our great Deliverance, when the vileft Ingratitude was à new Aggravation of every sin. His sense of these things the following Meditation will shew ; written August 17,1690. ;

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How do I fear that the Standard of Piety cis lost in the World, and of that Holiness

without which no Man shall see the Lord? I • know Christ will uphold his Church, and " the Holy Spirit will be with it in every • Age to the end. And therefore even in " this Age, he has his faithful Servants. But ! I fear they are so few, and the number of o" thers so great ; that either they are not ta"ken notice of in the Croud; or that people ' are so hardned and blinded, that seeing " they do not see, and hearing they will not "understand ; but choose rather to look up

on these as Men of unnecessary Severities, ' than such as keep up the Model of the Gor

pel. By this means we in this Generation s may well be all Pygmies in Grace and hard

ly any of us come up to the measure of the Stacture of Fofus Christ; but measuring our selves

by one another, may think our selves pro" per Christians. Where do we see Piety

practic'd in all its parts, Private, Domestick, ! and Publick? Some few that are much con( versant in good Books, and Primitive Ac• counts of things, may have an Idea of Chri

ftianity, beyond what this Age cou'd give

them: But then how easie is it for the cor"ruption of the Age we live in, to make this • be forgotten,or hinder it from being brought i down to Practice? Piety is rarely learn'd I wholly by Books, we need continual Exam"ples, and the conversation of good People,

to bring these Notions into Practice. The + reason of this seems to be, that Piety always

F 2

always

Dyr Chriftian ll its parts, that aren

always decays in the Peace of the Chorch. ' A good Man that lives in the continual pro' speat or apprehension of Death, is quite a'nother thing from the same good Man that

lives out of this prospect. When the whole Church therefore lives continually in this

apprehension, (as was the state of the Pri. • mitive Church, for the first Three Hundred “ Years after Christ) no wonder if it be quite

different in the ineasure and exercise of Pie

ty, from the Church at other times. 'Tis « true they were not always under actual Pero secution, but then it must be confidered, that • for some time after God frees Men from (this hard state, the sense of their former

Troubles leaves a deep Impression upon • their minds. They had contracted firm ' habits of strict and pious Living; and the • first freedom that God gave them from their

Fears, did not make them relax any thing of their strictness; but only encreas'd their thankfulness, and more cheerful serving him in their former road, till God thought fit to

bring again their former straits upon them, 6 by a renewed Persecution. And so it was, ' for a while after God put a final end to their • Perfecutions, by the Emperor Constantine's • becoming a Christian. With what Zeal did < the Christians flock to the publick Churches, < Confecrated from Heathen Fanes, to Tema • ples of the Living God, and cover the Pave"ments with their Proftrate Bodies? But by degrees this Feryour decay'd; Lukewarm

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