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EXTRAORDINARY AFFLICTION,

AND

GRACIOUS RELIEF

OF

A LITTLE BOY:

SUPPOSED TO BE THE

EFFECTS OF SPIRITUAL AGENCY.

Carefully examined, and faithfully narrated;

WITI

Observations on Demoniac Possession, and Animad-

versions on Superstition.

BY JAMES HEATON.

SECOND EDITION, IMPROV ED AND ENLARGED.

0001Cloees

• We speak what we know, and testify what we have seen.

Jesus CARIST.
* Flee from idolatry. I speak as to wise mens judge ye what
I say."-i Cor. x. 15.

PAUL
• Prove all things; hold fast that which is good."-1 Thess

v. 21.
* Resist the Devil, and he will flee from you. Draw nigh

unto God, and he will draw nigh unto you.' -James,

Printed and sold for the Author
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PREFACE
TO THE SECOND EDITION.

course.

THE former Edition of this Book was received

with more satisfaction and approbation than the writer anticipated. He well knew that the current of modish theory ran in opposition to the ancient truths and recent facts which he opposed to its

Opinions have their fashions; and one extreme'disposes to another. On the subject of satanic agency, many have reeled from credulity to scepticism; and some have endeavoured to construe the truth of God into a lie. Arrogant ignorance may impeach the divine veracity; but facts will speak for God; though we believe not, yet he abídeth faithful.

The case which is here narrated, the writer was unexpectedly and providentially called upon to examine. It was important, strange, and interesting: but it was also perplexing. Many who knew he was paying attention to it, were desirous to hear his testimony and opinion; particularly so, as many strange reports were in circulation, which, for the public good, it was better to rectify than neglect. Though frequently requested, he did not think it prudent to narrate the case in public congregations ; his word might have been misunderstood and misrepresented. To write long letters to his enquiring friends, and to relate the affair in the circles of his acquaintance, to vindicate his sentiments and obviate their objections in conversation, would encroach too

mach upon his time; and therefore, to publish the case with his reasonings upon it, and with observations upon the general subject of demoniac possession, &c. corroborated by quotations from Authors of established credit, appeared to him of all modes. of communication, the safest, the least objectionable, the most useful and satisfactory, and, all things considered--the best.

Knowing that many who have never seen a case of evident demoniac possession, and have been, like himself, perplexed with learned and positive contradictions on the subject, and desire more satisfactory information than mere theory can give, in publishing what he had seen, carefully examined, and certainly known, he acted on the approved principle, “DO unto others as ye would they should do unto you.”

The Author of the Bible frequently calls the attention of his readers to the subject of demoniac pos.session, and He illustrates, with all desirable plainness, His authorized mode of expulsion and relief. The inspired writers are good precedents; and if we grow ashamed of their common doctrines and righteous examples, it is time to search our hearts and amerd our manners. Some have thought that accounts of spiritual agency are to be despised, not. considered; and that superstitious practices are to be neglected, not reproved: but all are not so averse to divine testimony and, example. u No genuine truth,' says Dr. Beattie, “ did ever of itself produce effects inconsistent with real utility;” and certainly, what Essential Wisdom has often inculcated, can not be so useless as to merit negligence.

Though the facts, which are here recordedy, are too notorious to be contradicted; and though such as know the writer may not scruple his veracity: and those who know him not, lave no good reason to impeach it, especially as the case is circumstantially

marrated with references to times, persons, places, and things well known; yet, for the reader's further satisfaction, the truth of the Narrative is, in this Edition, ATTESTED by a sufficient number of wita

nesses.

Endeavouring to avoid the weakness of credulity, the wickedness of infidelity, and the perverseness of scepticism, the writer entered on the examination, as he ought, with an unbiassed mind. His chief objects of enquiry were the real nature of the case, and how it should be relieved. Being guided chief-Iy, if not entirely, by the plain word of God and common sense, his investigation terminated in success and satisfaction. The principle circumstances. and reasons which led him to his conclusion, and the experiments made to bring opinions to the severést test, with their unequivocal results, are fairly laid before the reader, that he also may judge for himself. What more can reason ask, or integrity perform?

Though the principle on which the writer has "solved the phenomenon," is too evident to admit of any substitution, and he is fully satisfied that his conclusion is legitimately drawn from premises that fully authorise it, and substantiated with all the kind and strength, of evidence which the nature of the case requires; yet he does not expect that his book will do more than the book, of God has done; that: is, convince and satisfy every reader. But he would suggest the propriety and necessity of reading the whole account in order to form an honest' or a correct opinion of it. -" Blame not before thou hast examined the truth. * About the same time this affair happened, some notorious cases of witchcraft were noised abroad; they were of long continuance, stubbornly evincing: demoniac infliction; and the public were respect

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