War and Change in the Balkans: Nationalism, Conflict and Cooperation

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Brad K. Blitz
Cambridge University Press, 2006 M10 12 - 290 pages
The violence following the break-up of the former Yugoslavia has lasted for more than a decade and continues to mark the region. This 2006 volume analyses the causes of the conflict and describes its course from the onset of war in Croatia to intervention in Kosovo. The book concentrates on four key transformations: the demise of Yugoslavia and the creation of new states; the importance of nationalist ideologies in the preparation of war and their subsequent decline in the post conflict era; the role of international actors as policy makers, implementing agencies, and arbiters; and the process of democratization and integration into European structures. With contributions from some of the world's leading scholars of the Balkans and personal accounts from journalists, diplomats, and civil servants drawing upon their own experiences of war and transition, War and Change in the Balkans provides an unparalleled insight into contemporary European history.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
1
state construction and state failure
13
The politics of national homogeneity
30
Miloševićs motiveless malignancy
44
Germany and the recognition of Croatia and Slovenia
57
mistakes and lessons
76
American cooperation with the International Criminal
87
The European Unions role in the Balkans
99
a personal account of
124
The war over Kosovo
143
I4 Kosovo and the prognosis for humanitarian
156
I5 The international administration of Kosovo since 1999
169
I7 Turkey Southeastern Europe and Russia
188
some geopolitical considerations
224
New beginnings? Refugee returns and postconflict
239
Bibliography
267

The disintegration of Yugoslavia Macedonias independence
110
Io The war in Croatia
118

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About the author (2006)

Brad K. Blitz received his PhD from Stanford University and is currently Reader in Political Geography at Oxford Brookes University. He has written extensively on the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia and has taught causes in international and comparative politics, refugee and migration studies at Stanford University, the University of California Santa Cruz, Middlesex University, Roehampton University and Oxford Brookes University.

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