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What thou wouldst highly,
That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
And yet wouldst wrongly win.

Act i. Sc. 5.

That no compunctious visitings of nature
Shake my fell purpose.

Act i. Sc. 5.

Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men
May read strange matters.

Act i. Sc. 5.

Coigne of vantage.

Act i. Sc. 6.

If it were done, when 't is done, then 't were well
It were done quickly. If the assassination
Could trammel up the consequence, and catch,
With his surcease, success; that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all here.

Act i. Sc. 7.

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Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return
To plague the inventor : this even-handed justice
Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice
To our own lips.

Act i. Sc. 7.

Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off. Act i. Sc. 7.

I have no spur

To prick the sides my intent, but only
Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself,
And falls on the other

Acti. Sc. 7.

I have bought Golden opinions from all sorts of people.

Act i. Sc. 7.

Letting I dare not wait upon I would,
Like the poor cat i' the adage.

Act i. Sc. 7.

I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more, is none.

Act i. Sc. 7.

Nor time, nor place, did then adhere.

Act i. Sc. 7.

Screw your courage to the sticking-place.

Act i. Sc. 7.

Memory, the warder of the brain.

Act i. Sc. 7.

Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my

hand ?
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To feeling, as to sight; or art thou but
A dagger of the mind; a false creation,
Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain ? Act ii. Sc. r.

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Thou marshal'st me the way that I was going.

Act ii. Sc. 1. Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my whereabout.

Act ii. Sc. I.

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Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell
That summons thee to heaven or to hell !

Act ii. Sc. I.

It was the owl that shrieked, The fatal bellman, which gives the stern'st good night.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

The attempt, and not the deed, confounds us.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

I had most need of blessing, and Amen
Stuck in my throat.

Act ü. Sc. 2.

Methought I heard a voice cry, ' Sleep no more !
Macbeth does murder sleep! the innocent sleep ;
Sleep, that knits up the ravelled sleave of care.
The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
Chief nourisher in life's feast.

dct ii. Sc. 2.

Infirm of purpose !

Act ii. Sc. 2.

My hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green

one red.

Act i. Sc. 2.

The labour we delight in, physics pain.

Actii. Sc. 3:

Confusion now hath made his masterpiece !
Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
The Lord's anointed temple, and stole thence
The life o' the building.

Actü. Sc. 3.

The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
Is left this vault to brag of.

Act ii. Sc. 3.

A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
Was by a mousing owl hawked at, and killed.

Acr ii. Sc. 4

Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
Thence to be wrenched with an unlineal hand,
No son of mine succeeding.

Act iii. Sc. 1.

Mur. We are men, my liege.
Mac. Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men.

Act ii. Sc. I.

Things without all remedy, Should be without regard : what's done is done.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

We have scotched the snake, not killed it.

Act iii. Sc. 2.

Duncan is in his grave! After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well. Act iii. Sc. 2.

But now, I am cabined, cribbed, confined, bound in To saucy doubts and fears.

Act iii. Sc. 4.

Now good digestion wait on appetite,
And health on both !

Act iii. Sc. 4.

Thou canst not say, I did it; never shake
Thy gory locks at me.

Act iü. Sc. 4.

The times have been, That, when the brains were out, the man would die, And there an end : but now they rise again, With twenty mortal murders on their crowns, And push us from our stools.

Act iii. Sc. 4.

Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with !

Act iii. Sc. 4.

What man dare, I dare.

Act iii. Sc. 4.

Take ny shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble.

Act iii. Sc. 4.

Unreal mockery,

hence !

Act iii. Sc. 4.

You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting, with most admired disorder.

Act ii. Sc. 4.

Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder ?

Act iii. Sc. 4.

Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once.

Act iii. Sc. 4.

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I 'll make assurance double sure, And take a bond of fate.

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Act iv. Sc. I

* These lines occur also in 'The Witch' of Thomas Middleton, Act v. Sc. 2; and it is uncertain to which the priority should be ascribed.

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