Pushing to the Front, Volume 1

Front Cover
Success Company's branch offices, 1911 - 824 pages

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This is one of those books that never goes out of style.
It is a hidden treshure.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Inspirational and an interesting look into the past. A forerunner of the self-help/motivational books of today. Sometimes you forget this was written over a 100 years a ago and then he will make a comment about how shameful it is that women can't vote. It it an enjoyable book full of quotes and anecdotes to help people become successful in life. Just as good as any of the new books being sold on this subject today. I  

Contents

I
iii
II
12
III
19
IV
46
V
59
VI
67
VIII
77
IX
95
XXXVIII
419
XXXIX
427
XL
438
XLI
457
XLII
471
XLIII
488
XLIV
499
XLV
511

X
108
XII
132
XIII
146
XIV
157
XVI
171
XVII
181
XVIII
191
XIX
204
XX
218
XXI
234
XXII
240
XXIII
251
XXIV
265
XXV
285
XXVI
301
XXVII
307
XXVIII
320
XXIX
329
XXX
344
XXXI
355
XXXIII
365
XXXIV
379
XXXV
390
XXXVI
399
XXXVII
410
XLVI
526
XLVIII
539
XLIX
550
L
561
LI
575
LII
587
LIII
603
LIV
622
LV
633
LVI
647
LVII
656
LVIII
668
LIX
676
LX
684
LXI
695
LXII
708
LXIII
711
LXIV
725
LXV
739
LXVII
751
LXIX
768
LXX
775
LXXI
788
LXXIII
802
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 18 - God, give us men! A time like this demands Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and ready hands; Men whom the lust of office does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have honor; men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking! Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog In public duty and in private thinking...
Page 12 - There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune ; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows, and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat; And we must take the current when it serves, Or lose our ventures.
Page 462 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates : The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Page 509 - For want of a nail, the shoe was lost, For want of a shoe, the horse was lost, For want of a horse, the rider was lost, For want of a rider, the battle was lost.
Page 344 - Then, welcome each rebuff That turns earth's smoothness rough, Each sting that bids nor sit nor stand but go! Be our joys three-parts pain! Strive, and hold cheap the strain; Learn, nor account the pang; dare, never grudge the throe!
Page 509 - ... for want of a nail the shoe was lost; for want of a shoe the horse was lost; and for want of a horse the rider was lost...
Page 453 - Then to side with Truth is noble when we share her wretched crust. Ere her cause bring fame and profit, and 'tis prosperous to be just. Then it is the brave man chooses, while the coward stands aside. Doubting in his abject spirit, till his Lord is crucified. And the multitude make virtue of the faith they had denied.
Page 762 - Wise men have said are wearisome; who reads Incessantly, and to his reading brings not A spirit and judgment equal or superior (And what he brings, what needs he elsewhere seek) Uncertain and unsettled still remains, Deep versed in books and shallow in himself, Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys, And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge; As children gathering pebbles on the shore.
Page 366 - Poverty is uncomfortable, as I can testify ; but nine times out of ten the best thing that can happen to a young man is to be tossed overboard, and compelled to sink or swim for himself. In all my acquaintance I never knew a man to be drowned who was worth the saving.
Page 252 - If a man can write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mousetrap than his neighbor, though he builds his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door.

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