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Some Missionaries have two standards a lower for baptism, a higher for the Lord's Supper. A certain amount of Christian knowledge and a corresponding outward walk, are sought for the former ; true conversion, as far as it can be ascertained, for the latter. Other Missionaries hold that the Word of God does not recognise two standards, and require the higher test for baptism, which carries with it admission to the communion.

Certificates of Baptism. These should be given with care. Not long ago, a great scoundrel deceived a young Missionary and obtained a certificate of baptism, recommending him as now a brother beloved. The use he made of it, was to go begging among Europeans, showing the certificate, and thus obtaining money to spend in debauchery.

XII. NATIVE CHRISTIANS. GENERAL VIEW:

Roman Catholics.—The following table will show the number and distribution of the adherents of the Church of Rome :

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700 22 100,000 97,708 48 2,620 1 4.8

729 779 846,156 | 878,691 653 22,6571 118'90,321 * Estimated Numbers.

The Madras Catholic Directory, on which the above Table is based, gives the fullest summary the compiler has met with respecting Roman Catholic Missions in India. It may be obtained annually by remitting 1 Rupee 2 Annas to the Catholic Book Depository, No. 2 Armenian Street, Madras.

Protestant Native Christians.--Zeigenbalg and Plutscho, the first Protestant Missionaries to India, landed at Tranquebar in 1706. Kiernander, the first Protestant Missionary to Bengal, proceeded from South India to Calcutta in 1758. In the Bombay Presidency, Protestant Missions seem to date only from 1813. Converts are by no means equally distributed. Out of 138,543 in India in 1862, about two-thirds were to be found within a radius of a hundred and fifty miles from Cape Comorin. 94,540 were Tamils; next to them were Bengalis, 16,277 in number. The following Tables, based on returns obtained by Dr. Mullens, give the statistics of Protestant Missions in 1852 and 1862, with the Societies.

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1852-1862 1852 1862 1862 1862 1852 1862 1852

1862 1852

1862 1852 1862 1852 1862 1852 1862 1852 1862 Assamese 10 6

5 36 84 1191 190| 490

422 56

6

38
Bengali

65 65 1

1610 141 3043 3616 13,379 16,277 4967 3061 528) 480

5979 6790 561 Canarese.. 34 47 4 6 32 42

970 642 684 514 1065

1301

2640 1740 2499 102 144 629 1107 180 431 106 149 Gujarati

8 6 1 5

24 742 105

653

20 112 39 49 20 3 Hindi Urdu, Punjabi 73 126 2 9 56123 739 15731 2205 5720 4229 5161207632

1614

5792 287
Khassiya
1

871 190) 838
2
4 23 45 100 184 60

400 19

26

17 18 11
Kole.
21 71
64 34 399 62

2400
34 58

16 33 Malayalim 18 23 2 71 43 87 1458 2534 6027 1,222 2994

2993 162 186
213 275 325

783 242 262
Marathi...
24 33 4 11 101
46 281 929 678 1979 3385 1500

1264

1781 1213 1123 811 266 Oriya ...

1] 12 1 17 19 287 431 906 1123 151

174 136 87

55 10
Pushtu

14 108 112
7

41

2321 Sindhi... 1 3 19

112 Singhalese

15 20 19

341 56 61 2329 2739 12,030 12,577 4856

5764 74 78 93 4841 1316 3202 34 44 Tamil...

108 132 19 531 368 778 9281 17,212 74,370 94,540 23,483 20,901 985 825 4390 5747 Telugu

7494) 7934 1183 1534 19 23 1 4

14 39 361 527 897 4531 7741

13301

334 880 71 482: 107) 175
ARRANGED ACCOR-
DING TO PRE-

SIDENCIES.
Bengal

102 113
1 17 130 189 3,500 4,719 14,778 20,774 6470 4820 790 695 6005 7119

669
N. W. Provinces,

1031) 830 946
Punjab
64 119 2 11
678 1,488 2032 5,301 3707 4398/ 191 564

1754

242 879) 175 719 Bombay

31

4 10 16 53 289 965

744 2,231 3480 2107

211 112 1144 1787 1222
158! 210

1157) 101 269
21 60 405 903 10,662 20,21876,591 110237|| 24.445 50611 165 1185

4286 6836 6639 8988|1470 2019
Ceylon...

37 37 23 42 98 102 3,281 3,859 18,046 15,273 9,402 8226 247| 164 1373 1657 2747 3844 203 145
Total... 392 519)
Burmah...

51 140 698 1365 18,410 31,249 412191 153816|| 47,504 44,612 2414 2720 14,562 23,377 11,519 15,899 2779 4098
22
43 411 18,439

59366 3778 438

586

963 103) Total 541 183

1776 49,688 213182

48,390 3158 Punjabi...

863

4201 1024

16,862 1 3 121 22 1491 98 432) 268 832

131 290 166576

18) 109

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Original Castes.-It has already been stated, how much each caste is isolated, any movement being confined to its own limits. People in England do not dis'criminate to them all Hindus are much alike. Indeed, Missionaries have been charged with being as proud of their high caste converts, as before the Mutiny European Officers were proud of their high caste Sepoys. This assertion is made in sheer ignorance. There may be a vast difference between the baptism of a Kulin Brahman and that of a Hindu scavenger. Both may be equally sincere ; but any man of experience will remember, that the former has every thing to lose, while the latter is placed in a higher position in the social scale. The former may become a Professor in a College and write a book like, “ Dialogues on the Hindu Philosophy ”; the latter may never learn even to read. The question has also another aspect of great import

The conversion of a Brahman tells upon all Hindus ; the baptism of a scavenger, so far from being an argument with the masses in favor of Christianity, has a contrary effect. The compiler utterly repudiates any caste-feeling--the whole system he detests intensely. Still, it cannot be ignored. As one of the greatest obstacles to the progress of the Gospel in India, it deserves the most careful investigation. It is very desirable to have, in addition to the numbers, a list of the castes from which Native Christians in India were originally drawn. Of course, it is impossible to tell in some cases, as with regard to orphan children in North India. Generally, however, it may readily be ascertained. The Bishop of Calcutta remarks in his last charge :

“ It is notorious that the only large amount of Missionary success in India has been gained among the aborigines of the country, and others unfettered by caste, free from the influence of Brahmins or Buddhist priests, and comparatively free from the bondage of an idolatrous superstition. The three most conspicuous triumphs of the Gospel in this country have been won

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