The Canadian Entomologist, Volumes 10-12

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Entomological Society of Canada, 1878
 

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Page 172 - Canada, reported at the meeting of the Entomological Club of the American Association for the Advancement of Science at...
Page 127 - In the month of September these beetles gather on the locust trees, where they may be seen glittering in the sunbeams, with their gorgeous livery of black velvet and gold, coursing up and down the trunks in pursuit of their mates, or to drive away their rivals, and stopping every now and then to salute those they meet with a rapid bowing of the shoulders, accompanied by a creaking sound indicative of recognition or defiance. Having paired, the female, attended by her partner, creeps over the bark,...
Page 128 - ... the passage becomes clogged and the burrow more or less filled with the coarse and fibrous fragments of wood, to get rid of which the grubs are often obliged to open new holes through the bark. The seat of their operations is known by the oozing of the sap and the dropping of the saw-dust from the holes. The bark around the part attacked begins to swell, and in a few years the trunks and limbs will become disfigured and weakened by large porous tumors, caused by the efforts of the trees to repair...
Page 166 - Riley, of Washington, has issued a special report on the Silk-worm, being a brief manual of instructions for the production of silk, with illustrations. Prof. AR Grote has written Preliminary Studies on the North American Pyralidae, and Samuel H. Scudder a Century of Orthoptera. Several additional numbers of Edwards' magnificent work on North American Butterflies have appeared, with charming plates.
Page 127 - It is velvet-black, and ornamented with transverse yellow bands, of which there are three on the head, four on the thorax, and six on the wing-covers, the tips of which are also edged with yellow. The first and second bands on each wing-cover are nearly straight; the third band forms a V, or, united with the opposite one, a W...
Page 99 - Bail before the association of naturalists, in 186i, which were illustrated by the exhibition of mould grown on mash, on which the fungus of the house-fly had been sown, and by a keg of beer brewed from such mash, and by a cake baked with this yeast. Both productions were declared perfect by all who tasted them an experiment in which I...
Page 73 - Of all the wood-boring insects in our land this is by far the most pernicious, wounding the trees the most cruelly. The stateliest oaks in our forests are ruined, probably in every instance where one of these borers obtains a lodgment in their trunks.
Page 173 - Manuscript Notes from My Journal : Cotton and the principal insects, &c., frequenting or injuring the plant in the United States, by Townend Glover.
Page 125 - ... two-thirds of their length, are black, the remaining third is yellow, and they are ornamented with bands and spots arranged in the following manner : a yellow spot on each shoulder, a broad yellow curved band or arch, of which, the yellow scutel forms the keystone on the base of the wing-covers ; behind this a zigzag yellow band forming the letter W; across the middle another yellow band arching backwards, and on the yellow tip a curved band and spot of a black color; legs yellow, and the under...
Page 99 - ... into yeast fungus. The experiments made by Dr. Bail cover a period of more than a dozen years, since the numerous objections which were made against his results induced him to repeat again and again his experiments in different ways. I am obliged to state that even now prominent botanists do not accept Dr. Bail's views, which he maintains to be true and to be corroborated by new and sure experiments. This question, important as it may be for botanists, is without any influence regarding my proposition,...

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