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274

FLAG-FLATTERY, &c.

FLAG. (See BANNER.)

FLATTERY-SYCOPHANT - PRAISE.

Or who would ever care to do brave deed,
Or strive in virtue others to excel,
If none should yield him his deserved meed,
Due praise, that is the spur of doing well?
For if good were not praised more than ill,

None would choose goodness of his own free will.

That, sir, which serves and seeks for gain,

And follows but for form,

Will pack when it begins to rain,

And leave thee in the storm.

He would not flatter Neptune for his trident;

SPENSER

SHAKSPEARE

Or Jove for his power to thunder.

You play the spaniel,

SHAKSPEARE

And think with wagging of your tongue to win me.

Of all wild beasts, preserve me from a tyrant ;
And of all tame-a flatterer.

The firmest purpose of a woman's heart
To well-tim'd, artful flattery may yield.

"Tis an old maxim in the schools,

That flattery's the food of fools,

Yet, now and then, your men of wit
Wil, condescend to take a bit.

SHAKSPEARE

BEN JONSON.

LILLO.

SWIFT.

Minds,

By nature great, are conscious of their greatness,
And hold it mean to borrow aught from flattery.

My soul is open to the charms of praise:
There is no joy beyond it, when the mind
Of him who hears it can, with honest pride,
Confess it just, and listen to its music.

ROWE.

WHITEHEAD'S Roman Father.

In praising Chloris, moon, and stars, and skies,
Are quickly made to match her face and eyes;
And gold and rubies, with as little care,

To fit the colour of her lips and hair;

And mixing suns, and flowers, and pearls and stones,

Make them seem all complexions at once.

For praise, that's due, does give no more
To worth than what it had before;

But, to commend without desert,

Requires a mastery of art,

BUTLER.

That sets a glass on what's amiss,

And says what should be, not what is.

BUTLER.

The love of praise, howe'er conceal'd by art,

Reigns, more or less, and glows in every heart;
The proud, to gain it, toils on toils endure,
The modest shun it, but to make it sure.

YOUNG'S Love of Fame.
Of praise a mere glutton, he swallow'd what came,
And the puff of a dunce, he mistook it for fame;
Till, his relish grown callous almost to disease,
Who pepper'd the highest, was surest to please.
GOLDSMITH'S Retaliation.

A flattering painter, who made it his care
To draw men as they ought to be, not as they are.
GOLDSMITH'S Retaliation

276

FLATTERY-SYCOPHANT - PRAISE

To hear his soothing tales, she feigns delays:
What woman can resist the force of praise?

Methinks you 're over-nice :

True; flattery is a shocking vice;
Yet, sure, whene'er the praise is just,
One may commend without distrust.

Long, open panegyric drags at best,

GAY'S Trivia.

GAY's Fables.

And praise is only praise when well addrest.

GAY's Epistles.

But flattery never seems absurd;

The flatter'd always takes your word.
Impossibilities seem just,

They take the strongest praise on trust;
Hyperboles, tho' ne'er so great,
Will still come short of self-conceit.

The villain's censure is extorted praise.

GAY'S Fables.

Praise of the wise and good!—it is a meed
For which I would long years of toil endure-
Which many a peril, many a grief, would cure.

POPE.

SIR E. BRYDGES.

Oh! it is worse than mockery to list the flatt'rer's tone,
To lend a ready ear to thoughts the cheek must blush to

own,

To hear the red lip whisper'd of, and the flowing curl, and

eye,

Made constant theme of eulogy extravagant and high-
And the charm of person worshipp'd, in an homage offer'd

not

To the perfect charm of virtue, and the majesty of thought.
J. G. WHITTIER.

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