The poetical works of William Cowper, Volume 2

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W. Pickering, 1853

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Page 32 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; * if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free, They touch our country, and their shackles, fall.
Page 252 - A glory gilds the sacred page, Majestic like the sun : It gives a light to every age ; It gives, but borrows none.
Page 176 - One song employs all nations ; and all cry, " Worthy the Lamb, for He was slain for us ! " The dwellers in the vales and on the rocks Shout to each other, and the mountain tops From distant mountains catch the flying joy, Till, nation after nation taught the strain, Earth rolls the rapturous hosanna round.
Page 91 - tis the twanging horn o'er yonder bridge, That with its wearisome but needful length Bestrides the wintry flood, in which the moon Sees her unwrinkled face reflected bright...
Page 221 - Where is the blessedness I knew, When first I saw the Lord? Where is the soul-refreshing view Of Jesus and his word? 3 What peaceful hours I once enjoyed ! How sweet their memory still ! But they have left an aching void The world can never fill.
Page 92 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 170 - The sum is this : If man's convenience, health, Or safety, interfere, his rights and claims Are paramount, and must extinguish theirs. Else they are all, the meanest things that are, As free to live and to enjoy that life As God was free to form them at the first, Who in his sovereign wisdom made them all.
Page 44 - Himself, as conscious of his awful charge, And anxious mainly that the flock he feeds May feel it too. Affectionate in look, And tender in address, as well becomes A messenger of grace to guilty men.
Page 346 - Puss was tamed by gentle usage; Tiney was not to be tamed at all ; and Bess had a courage and confidence that made him tame from the beginning. I always admitted them into the parlour after supper, when, the carpet affording their feet a firm hold, they would frisk, and bound, and play a thousand gambols...
Page 27 - God made the country, and man made the town. What wonder then that health and virtue, gifts, That can alone make sweet the bitter draught, That life holds out to all, should most abound And least be threatened in the fields and groves...

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