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neral for the ecclesiastical jurisdiction ; and were so hardy as to excommunicate those who appeared at the courts of the protestant bishops."Ibid.

p. 184.

Thus, under the protection and countenance of the court, popery was making great and dangerous advances : of this the several parliaments summoned by the king made earnest complaints; and frequently and humbly prayed him to put the laws against recusants in vigorous execution.

.“ In answer to their petition the king solemnly promised – That the laws against papists shall be put in execution.--That no popish recusant shall be admitted to come to court but upon special occasion according to the statute of the third of James. That no popish recusant shall be admitted into his service, or into that of his royal consort.--That all such persons shall be removed from all places of authority and government.-Rapin, Vol. x. p. 23. But see how these promises were performed.—“ The king himself quickly after, by special warrant, released eleven Romish priests out of prison. And when the next parliament petitioned for a removal of papists from offices of trust, it appeared by a list annexed to their petition that there were no less than fifty, nine of the nobility and gentry of that religion in the commission."--Neal, Vol. II. p. 164.

“The papists were in high reputation at court : the king counted them his best subjects, and relaxed the penal laws. Within the

Within the compass of four years, seventy-four letters of grace were signed by the king's own hand : sixty-four priests were dismissed from the Gate-House; and twenty nine by warrant from the secretary of state at the instance of the queen, &c. Protections were frequently granted to put a stop to the proceedings of the courts of justice against them. I have before me a list of popish recusants convicted in the twenty-nine English counties of the southern division, from the first of king Charles to the sixteenth, which amounts to no less than eleven thousand nine hundred and seventy (as the account was given in to the long parliament by Mr. John Pulford employed in their prosecution by the king himself) all of whom were released or pardoned. And if their number were so great in the south, how must they abound in the northern and Welch counties, where they are computed three to one! Popery was countenanced to that degree at York, that mass was said in every street, and the protestants so affronted, that they were almost afraid to go to church. At Westminster-Hall one James a papist, being summoned amongst many others by an order of parliament, and pressed by Mr. Hayward, a justice of peace, to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, he suddenly drew his knife and stabbed the justice, with some reproachful words for persecuting poor catholics.

“During the first fiftteen years of his reign the Roman catbolics were not only screened from the rigour of the law, but even encouraged and countenanced to such a degree, that he trusted them with the most important offices, as of privycounsellors, secretaries of state, and lords-lieutenants of counties.”—-Neal, p. 304.-Ibid, p. 576.Clarend. Vol. 1. p. 249.----Rapin, Vol. XII. p. 583.

« Weston was lord high treasurer, Windbank secretary of state, Cottington chancellor of the exchequer, Porter of the bed-chamber: besides these were Lord Conway, Sir K. Digby, Sir T. Matthews, Mr. Montague jun, the duchess of Montague, the countess of Newport, and many others, all papists, and in high favour, who had the king and queen's ear whensoever they pleased."--Neal, Vol. 11. p. 305.

As the king zealously protected and favoured the papists throughout his whole reign, which was one of the unhappy causes of the war which ensued; so these, in return, exerted themselves vigorously for the support of bis majesty, in bis arbitrary measures, and made a considerable part of the army which fought for him. “I have before me,” says an historian, "a list, printed by the papists in the reign of Charles II. of the popish noblemen and gentlemen which lost their lives or estates in his father's service. · Popish lords and gentlemen in king Clarles

I's army who were killed.
The Earl of Carnarvon.
The Lord Viscount Dunbar.
Sir John Smith, Baronet.
Sir John Cansfield.
Sir Henry Cage.
Sir John Digby.
Sir Peter Brown.
Sir Nicholas Fostescue.

Sir Troilus Tuberville, captain lieutenant of the king's life-guard.

Sir John Preston.
Sir Thomas Tildesley.
Sir Arthur Ashton.

14 Colonels.

17 Lieutenant-Colonels.
Besides

14 Majors.
66 Captains.
18 Lieutenants and Cornets.

38 Gentlemen.
Wounded and Sequestered.
Major-General William Webb.
Marquis of Winchester.
Marquis of Worcester.

fore me a list of popish recusants convicted in the twenty-nine English counties of the southern division, from the first of king Charles to the sixteenth, which ainounts to no less than eleven thousand nine hundred and seventy (as the account was given in to the long parliament by Mr. John Pulford employed in their prosecution by the king himself) all of whom were released or pardoned. And if their number were so great in the south, how must they abound in the northern and Welch counties, where they are computed three to one! Popery was countenanced to that degree at York, that mass was said in every street, and the protestants so affronted, that they were almost afraid to go to church. At Westminster-Hall one James a papist, being summoned amongst many others by an order of parliament, and pressed by Mr. Hayward, a justice of peace, to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, he suddenly drew his knife and stabbed the justice, with some reproachful words for persecuting poor catholics.

During the first fiftteen years of his reign the Roman catholics were not only screened from the rigour of the law, but even encouraged and countenanced to such a degree, that he trusted them with the most important offices, as of privycounsellors, secretaries of state, and lords-lieutenants of counties.”—-Neal, p. 304.-Ibid, p. 576.Clarend, Vol. 1. p. 249.

--Rapin, Vol. XII. p. 583. “ Weston was lord high treasurer, Windbank secretary of state, Cottington chancellor of the exchequer, Porter of the bed-chamber: besides these were Lord Conway, Sir K. Digby, Sir T. Matthews, Mr. Montague jun. the duchess of Montague, the countess of Newport, and many others, all papists, and in high favour, who had the king and queen's ear whensoever they pleased.”Neal, Vol. 11. p. 305.

As the king zealously protected and favoured the papists throughout his whole reign, which was one of the unhappy causes of the war which ensued; so these, in return, exerted themselves vigorously for the support of bis majesty, in bis arbitrary measures, and made a considerable part of the army which fought for him. “I have before me,” says an historian, " a list, printed by the papists in the reign of Charles II. of the popish noblemen and gentlemen which lost their lives or estates in his father's service. Popish lords and gentlemen in king Clarles I's army who were killed.

.
The Earl of Carnarvon.
The Lord Viscount Dunbar.
Sir John Smith, Baronet.
Sir John Cansfield.
Sir Henry Cage.
Sir John Digby.
Sir Peter Brown.
Sir Nicholas Fostescue.
Sir Troilus Tuberville, captain lieutenant
of the king's life-guard.

Sir John Preston.
Sir Thomas Tildesley.
Sir Arthur Ashton.

14 Colonels.
17 Lieutenant-Colonels.

14 Majors.
Besides

66 Captains.
18 Lieutenants and Cornets.

38 Gentlemen.
Wounded and Sequestered.
Major-General William Webb.
Marquis of Winchester.
Marquis of Worcester.

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