Lacon: Or, Many Things in Few Words ...

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1826

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Page 3 - Wife' set out in quest of lovers; Morality's prim personification, In which not Envy's self a flaw discovers; To others' share let 'female errors fall', For she had not even one - the worst of all.
Page 12 - Man's love is of man's life a thing apart ; 'Tis woman's whole existence...
Page 119 - Liberty will not descend to a people, a people must raise themselves to liberty ; It is a blessing that must be earned before it can be enjoyed.
Page 35 - Alas ! the love of women ! it is known To be a lovely and a fearful thing ; For all of theirs upon that die is thrown, And if 'tis lost, life hath no more to bring To them but mockeries of the past alone...
Page 94 - How can I love to see thee shine So bright, whom I have bought so dear ? The tent-ropes flapping lone I hear...
Page 32 - Fill'd with the face of heaven, which, from afar, Comes down upon the waters; all its hues, From the rich sunset to the rising star, Their magical variety diffuse: And now they change ; a paler shadow strews Its mantle o'er the mountains; parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues *> With a new colour as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, till 'tis gone and all is gray.
Page 95 - Far from my sacred natal clime, I haste to an untimely grave ; The daring thoughts that soared sublime Are sunk in ocean's southern wave. Slave of the mine ! thy yellow light Gleams baleful as the tomb-fire drear.
Page 6 - Lucretius' irreligion is too strong For early stomachs to prove wholesome food; I can't help thinking Juvenal was wrong, Although no doubt his real intent was good, For speaking out so plainly in his song, So much, indeed, as to be downright rude; And then what proper person can be partial To all those nauseous epigrams of Martial?
Page 44 - For first, is there any principle in all nature more mysterious than the union of soul with body; by which a supposed spiritual substance acquires such an influence over a material one, that the most refined thought is able to actuate the grossest matter?

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