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MONOGRAPH

ON THE

SOUTHGATE FAMILY

OF

SCARBOROUGH, MAINE

THEIR ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS

BY LEONARD B. CHAPMAN

MEMBER OF THE MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
ALSO OF THE MAINE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

-We miss one from among our number,
And, searching back, can only find where lies
A cold, stiff form, wrapped in wakeless slumber,
Whilė Hylas-echoes mock our frantic cries.

- John Barrett Southgate

HUBBARD W. BRYANT

BOOKSELLER AND PUBLISHER

PORTLAND, MAINE

CS

1 S726

1907 149.06 JAN 13 1908

ERRATA.

Page 7.

Bottom of first column, in front of "1 — Steward,” place this character (*).

12. The names of two children (3 and 4), of John C. Boyd,

died young.

In front of the name Augusta Murray, same page, this character (*) should appear.

18. For 1872 insert 1772.

31. After the name of Robert Swan, place Esq.

32. Near the bottom of the last column it reads as follows:

“The corner stone of St. Luke's Cathedral was laid on State
street, August 7th, 1854, and on July 10, 1855, the building
was consecrated."
It was the corner stone of the Episcopal church edifice on
Congress street, near State, that was laid August 7, 1854, the
edifice being now known as St. Stephen's church.
The St. Luke's, over which Bishop Southgate watched the
year of its birth, sold its first building to St. Stephen's for
$17,000, and erected its present structure on State street, at a
cost of $110,000, and is not yet finished.

47. For "Dandridge" near the bottom of the last page, substitute

Bedinger.

PREFACE.

When I consented to occupy temporarily the editorial chair of the Deering News — a journal published in Portland, Me., but devoted to local matters in Deering, which was then an independent municipality, since annexed territorially by an edict of the State Legislature to Portland - I announced that under the caption of “Grandpa's Scrap Book,” I should begin on the following week the publication of obtainable records of marriages, births and deaths of persons, families and events connected therewith, and continue the practice from week to week at suoh length as circumstances would allow, of those who had lived in the distant past and left foot prints upon the sands of time, and in some cases continue the story of descent of the individual name to the latest date. This announcement was made June 30th, 1894, and it was soon made apparent to the publishers of the journal, by the increased circulation, that the innovation coupled with other changes, was very acceptable to the subscribers of the publication.

May 14th, 1898, after an elapse of nearly four years — a period of many local events a return to which even in thought is now exciting of which the News was more than a simple recorder of happenings, I presented my last editorial to the public, which was followed on May 28, 1898, by a “Publisher's Card” that closed as follows:

“Mr. Chapman will still conduct "Grandpa's Scrap Book, thus continuing this valuable feature of the News."

For a period of nearly six more consecutive years I kept on in the work and then stopped because I could not keep up with the demands of the compositors for "copy,” thus making in all nearly ten years. The productions of this expenditure of labor have been gathered and preserved both by individuals and societies. And all this labor has been bestowed gratuitously.

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