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joy, and is entered into the place of his reft, where the righteous shine forth as the sun, in the kingdom of Their Father.

Signed in and on behalf of faid monthly meeting, by

Holden,
LYDIA ARNOLDS

I

A Testimony from the national half-year's meeting of Friends

in Ireland concerning Job Scott, late of Providence, in the fate of Rhode Island, &c. in America. T having pleased the Almighty to call, from works

to rewards, this our beloved friend, we feel our minds engaged to give forth a testimony concerning him.

From genuine marks evinced in the course of his peligious services, we believe him to have been an instrument fitted and prepared by the great Master, through deep and repeated baptifm, for use and fervice in his church militant; called and sent forth by the immediate influences of his fpirit to publish the gospel; and being preserved in an eminent degree, carefully attentive to the leadings thereof, the word of the Lord through him was often as a fire and as

a hammer to break the rock in pieces.' Many were the bitter cups allotted him, in the dispensations of unerring wisdom, which though hard to flesh and blood, yet he appeared not to shrink therefrom; but in resignation to the divine will, and a surrender of his own, he was concerned to follow the Captain of his salvation, who was made perfect through sufferings ;--and thus, by abiding under the power of the cross, he might well have adopted the language of the apostle, by the grace of God I am what I am,

and his grace which was bestowed on me was not • in vain ; but I laboured abundantly, yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.'

He was a diligent waiter, to experience renewed qualification for service before he attempted to move

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either in the ministry or in the transactions of the discipline; as well knowing, that without a fresh a. nointing, any endeavours to act must prove ineffectual, and tend to centre in lifeless formality, against which he was zealously concerned to bear testimony.

His conversation was coupled with fear, as well as seasoned with grace; and being deep in heavenly mys. teries, he was cautious of squandering the same, yet, when at liberty for conversation, his communica. tions were agreeable, and remarkably instructive.

He visited the meetings of Friends in this nationalso had much religious service among those not in profession with us, and was a sharp threshing inftrų. ment in the Lord's hand, against all who preached for hire and divined for money, being earnestly concerned to call the people off from dead works, that they might be brought to experience the efficacy of true religion in the newness of life.

In his last illness, at the house of our friend Eliza. beth Shackleton, of Ballitore, he was much resigned, although the disorder, which proved the small-pox, lay heavy on him. He spoke of the things of God, and those that appertain to his kingdom, yet was very modest and diffident of his labours to promote them in the hearts of the people; but gave evident marks of his peace of mind, and assurance that he had no doubt of a mansion of reft prepared for him, whene the wicked cease from troubling, and where the weary are at rest, experiencing great serenity and composure even as a morning without clouds.

He departed this life the 22d of 11th mo. 1793, aged upwards of 42 years, and has left an example which speaks loudly to us his survivors, • follow me, as I have followed Christ.'

Signed in, by order, and on behalf of our halfyear's meeting for the nation of Ireland, held in ublin, the ift of 5th mo. 1794, by James FISHER, Clerk to the mens' meeting. ANNA SHANNON, Clerk to the womens' meeting.

JOURNAL

OF THE

LIFE AND TRAVELS

OF

JOB SCOTT

CHAP. I.

His birth and parentage. The early impressions of

truth on his mind. On children in general. A series of visitations of divine love. His frequent transgreffon, trials about water-baptism, predeftination, &e.

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PORASMUCH as it hath pleased divine wis

dom to lead and conduct my soul through many, various and afflictive dispensations; as well as through some very comfortable enjoyments; giving me to partake largely of afflictions; bearing up my mind through them; bringing me forth again and again rejoicing, after scenes of deep diftress; and wonderfully preserving me through some very deep, and perhaps somewhat unusual probations, in my travel towards the land of rest; I feel, and have often felt, an engagement of mind to leave behind me some memorandums in commea moration of his gracious dealings with me from my youth.

I was born, according to the best account ! could obtain, and according to the present or new style, on the 18th day of the roth month 1751, in the township of Providence, now North-Providence, in the colony (now state) of RhodeIland and Providence Plantations, in New-England. My parents names were John and Lydia Scott; who were accounted honest people, though my father made but little profession of religion. My mother was more zealous, and attended Friends meetings, when she conveniently could, taking me divers times with her, and I think a few times another or two of the children; though we were all but young, for I being the eldest, was but ten years old when she died. I can well remember the serious impressions and contemplations which, at that early period of life, and for some years before my mother's decease, attend. ed my min

could

mind as I sat in meeting with her, and on the way home. I even had longing defires to become truly religious, and to serve and fear God, as Abraham Ifaac and Jacob did, and others that I read or heard of. My mother endeavoured much to restrain us from being in the company of rude and vicious children, and would sometimes call us together, and labour to have us fit in Glence with her, which we did: and though I then understood but little of the intent of it, it has since afforded me a degree of folid satisfaction, in believing the Lord bad given her to know and partake of the fublime enjoyments and substantial benefits of true, inward, christian filence, and waiting upon God: and that she was desirous we her children might, in our tender years, be made acquainted with at least some secret touches of that divine favour which I doubt not she felt and experienced in such seasons of retirement: and though, as I observed, I unstood but little about it then; yet I have since had reason to believe it was a real advantage to me; and that it has often been remembered since to my benefit.

I

I am fully perfuaded of the great advantage, and spiritual usefulness to children and others, resulting from frequent silent waiting on the Lord. I have seen lively and convincing evidence of it, even in children very young in years; and fully believe thie impressions of divine goodness have been such to their minds at some such seasons, even when there has not been a word uttered vocally, as have last'ingly remained, and powerfully tended to beget the true' fear and love of God in their young and tender hearts. And O! 'that parents were more generally concerned to do all they could towards leading their tender offspring into an early acquaintance with, and relish of divine things: best learned, and most livingly, and experimentally sealed upon the soul, in a state of filent introversion, and feeling after God.

I was told by some of my kindred who were preTent at my inother's death (for it being night I was not present myself) that her departure was joyful and glorious; and that very near her last breath was spent in fervent fuplication to the Lord her God.

And now, not at all doubting but her immortal fpirit is at rest in Jesus, I leave her, and proceed to' a further relation of the exercise of my own mind, having this testimony to bear, that almost as early as I can remember any thing, I can well remember the Lord's secret 'workings in my heart, by his grace or holy fpirit; very sensibly bringing me under condemnation for my evil thoughts and actions, as rudeness and bad words, (though not frequent in the use of them) disobedience to parents; inwardly wifhing, in moments of anger, fome evil to such as offended me; and such like childish and corrupt dispositions and practices, which over and beyond all outward instruction I was made sensible were evil, and sprang from a real

root

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