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His school consists at present of must be constantly with the child, about ninety boys, German, Prus- always talking, questioning, exsian, French, Swiss, Italian, Span- plaining, and repeating. The puish, and English. It is divided into pils, however, by this process, are four principal classes, according to brought into very close intimacy the attainments of the pupils. with the instructor. Their capaciThese classes are subdivided into ties, all their faculties and propensiothers. There are seven school ties, become laid open to his obserrooms in the castle, and twelve vation. This gives him an advantteachers or professors. His head age, which cannot possibly be professor, Joseph Schmidt, has been gained, in the ordinary way in brought up in the institution, and which schools are generally taught. is a very efficient and worthy man. The children look well, appear very He is a native of one of the German contented, and apparently live in Cantons and speaks and writes per- great harmony one with another; iectly the German and French. He which, considering the diversity of is a man of modest demeanor and national character and temper here entirely devoted to the institution. collected, can be attributed only to He has written treatises on several the spirit of love and affection of the subjects taught in the school which sways the breast of the prinand adapted to its methods.

cipal of the institution, and extends We spent most of the day in the its benign influence throughout all different school-rooms, witnessing the departments. In the afternoon the exercises of the scholars. Very we went, with Pestalozzi, Greaves, few books are used, as it is expected and Bucholz, a German clergyman, the children can read well before (who is here on a visit to the instithey come there. But to describe tution), and one or two others, to the modes of teaching, so as to ren- visit a free school of twelve or fourder them clearly intelligible, would teen children, which Pestalozzi has require much more time and space established in the village of Clendy, than I can possibly allot to it, were at a short distance from the castle. I ever so competent to make it These are the children taken from known. We saw the exercises of the families of poor people, selected arithmetic, writing, drawing, math- on account of their character and ematics, lessons in music and gym- talents, in order to be educated as nastics, something of geography, teachers, with a view to extend and French, Latin, and German. To

perpetuate the principles and opeteach a school, in the way practised ration of the system. One-half of here, without book, and almost en- them are boys and the other half tirely by verbal instruction, is ex- girls. Their principal instructor is tremely laborious. The teacher a sister of Schmidt, the chief master,

an exceeding clever and interesting young woman. She has another sister also with her, younger than herself, who will soon become qualified to act as instructor. These pupils were exercised before us, in arithmetic, in drawing, and in music. The girls, seated round a table, and busy with their needles, had questions in arithmetic given them by the mistress, which they were to solve by their heads. They are thus led on, from the most simple beginnings, to comprehend the principles of arithmetic, and to work questions with great expertness, solely by a mental process. A male teacher is provided for the boys though the mistress often assists in their instruction. This little school promises to be well cared for, and of service to the Pestalozzian cause. We were much pleased with its appearance, and with the assurance it affords, that whatever there is of value and importance in this system, it will not be lost.

The success of this mode of instruction, greatly depends upon the personal qualifications of those who undertake to conduct it. There is nothing of mechanism in it, as in the Lancasterian plan; no laying down of precise rules for managing classes, etc. It is all mind and feeling. Its arrangements must always depend on the ages, talents, and tempers of the scholars, and require, on the part of the teachers, the most diligent and faithful attention. Above all, it requires that the

teacher should consider himself as the father and bosom friend of his pupils, and to be animated with the most affectionate desires for their good. Pestalozzi himself is all this. His heart glows with such a spirit, that the good old man can hardly refrain from bestowing kisses on all with whom he is concerned. He holds out his hands to his pupils on every occasion, and they love him as a child loves its mother. His plan of teaching is just fit for the domestic fireside, with a father or mother in the centre, and a circle of happy children around them. He is aware of this, and wishes to extend the knowledge of his plan to every parent. Pestalozzi is seventy-two years of age. It has been quite unfortunate for the progress of his system on the continent, that he pays so little attention to exteriors, regarding dress, furniture, etc., as of no moment whatever, provided the mind and heart be right.

The weather continuing wet, , we resolved to wait till the morrow, and take the diligence to Lausanne and Geneva. Much of the day was spent at the castle, in the school-rooms, and in conversation with Greaves. I omitted to mention, that we attended last evening, to the religious exercise which terminates the business of the day. The scholars assembled in a room called the chapel, but very simply furnished, with benches, and a table. When all were collected, Pestalozzi, directing his face chiefly to the boys,

began to speak in German, moving sisting chiefly of simple, but simulabout, from side to side, directing taneous movements of the arms, his attention, for some time, to the legs, feet, head, etc., stepping, boys on his right, and then advanc- marching, turning and jumping, all ing toward those on his left. This intended to exercise the various motion backward and forward, con- muscles which give motion to the tinued about twenty minutes; he limbs and head, and to make the was constantly speaking, and some- boys acquainted with the elements times with considerable earnestness. of all those movements. This exIt was altogether unintelligible to ercise took place in one of the large me, but I afterwards learned, that it bed-rooms. We attended, by inconsisted of a recapitulation of the vitation, last evening a lecture given occurrences of the day, noticing by Schmidt, the head teacher, to a particularly everything of moment, number of young men, among and intermingling the whole with whom were four Russians, sent by short prayers, adapted to the cir- the Emperor to gain information, cumstances mentioned in the dis- in England, and other countries, course. If, for example, any of the relative to the best modes of teachboys had quarrelled, or behaved un- ing. They had been in England, seemly to each other, or to their and spoke our language tolerably teacher, he would speak to the case, well. The lectures are to illustrate and accompany his remarks with a more fully, the principles and propious ejaculation. It is probable, cesses adopted in the Pestalozzian that he sometimes engages more

institution. formally in this exercise. As it was We had the company, this evenit appeared to gain the whole atten- ing, at our lodgings, of Frederick tion of his audience. It was con- Bucholz, who was lately a chaplain cluded by reading, from a small to the king's German legion in Engbook, what appeared to be a hymn land. He had been some time with or psalm.

Pestalozzi, and was able to give us A company of English visitors more information with respect to attended at the castle to-day, con- some parts of the system, than we sisting of men and women. The could obtain by a short visit to the boys performed some of their gym

school itself. nastic exercises before them, con

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0. T. CORSON, EDITOR.

MARGARET W. SUTHERLAND,

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Happy New Year.

Make good resolutions, and keep them. - There is a growing and perhaps unfortunate tendency in conservative educational circles to poke fun at the new cult, "Child Study." This tendency is not lessened by the silly stuff that is being published as the result of "investigation" in the new field. Here is a sample:

“Fear was first manifested in the fifth week. The child was laid nude on the bed, whereupon he started and threw up his arms as though afraid of falling. His fears were

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removed by throwing a light cover- Put your hard licks on the old ing over him or by putting on a Common Branches and do not be garment."

afraid of the good old way. Many The absurdity of this performance enthusiastic admirers of nature as a means of reaching valuable studies and elementary science will psychological conclusions deserves swing far to the extreme before the the castigating pen of a Dickens. good sense of the common people Think of trying to get "scientific" will bring them back with a reacdata by watching the antics of an tion." unclad baby when placed upon a

ON TO WASHINGTON. cold counterpane! Suppose the child

The announcement that the next had been similarly treated the week before: it would very likely have

meeting of the N. E. A. will be held

at Washington, D. C., is very satis“thrown up its arms”, or screamed

factory to the teachers of Ohio. or done some other thing, and then

We ought to carry off the banner the experimenters could have sol

for the largest attendance again as emnly recorded the momentous fact

we did in 1894 when the meeting that it "manifested fear” during the fourth week. At this rate we shall

was held at Asbury Park. To the

majority of the teachers in the State soon need a society to rescue babies

this will furnish the one opportunity from being "child studied" into

of a lifetime to visit our beautiful croup and tonsilitis, also a censor

Capital City and at the same time ship to protect educational literature from the infliction of unmitigated

attend the meetings of the Great

Association. Ordinarily speaking, slop. Learning to do by Doing.

no teacher can afford to miss it. After the article by Mr. Sim- Begin to get ready as soon as you kins on "Up Stream" was in print,

read this, and tell your friends about the following characteristic note,

it. For the benefit of our readers which we take the liberty of pub

we quote the following from a letlishing, was received from him: ter sent by Secretary Irwin Shepard "Some time since, I wrote a de

to the editor December 11, 1897: scription or narration of one of our

Let me repeat the essentials of journeys "Up Stream" and sent the

the announcement. The Washing

ton meeting will be from the evensame to Brother Burns.

He sent

ing of July 7 to the evening of July the same to you. What I wish to 12, inclusive. No sessions will be say is this: If you ever publish the held on the afternoon and evening same, I wish the following added

of Saturday, July 9. The churches

of Washington will be invited to somewhere in the article.

arrange for sermons and addresses “Do not take pupils on such an

on Sunday, July 10. It is believed excursion oftener than once a year. that this rest in the midst of the

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