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impossibility, so long as you do as the donors or this token desire; to wit, keep it always in sight. Take it, and take with it the prayer of every Buckeye teacher for your future happiness, welfare, and success.

FIELD NOTES. -Supt. W. McK. Vance, of Urbana, has been re-elected for three years at an annual salary of $1,800, and has also been made acting principal of the high school at an additional salary of $600.

-Supt. S. L. Rose, of Hamilton, has been re-elected for two years at an annual salary of $2,300.

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-E. M. Craig, who has been the successful principal of the New Vienna high school for several years has been elected to the superintendency at Sabina.

-Supt. W. W. Boyd, formerly of Marietta, will take charge of the Painesville schools in September.

-Supt. Hall, of Huron, was very kindly remembered on his retirement, by his teachers, in the presentation of a beautiful gift.

MY FRIENDS: - I have oiten heard it said that language either expresses or conceals thought, but I am certain that no language can either express or conceal the emotions I now feel. It seems to me that during my whole life I have been the recipient of nothing but kind words and deeds; but this occasion furnishes the culmination of all kindness on the part of my friends. The only preparation I have had for this occasion is found in an anecdote which I was fortunate enough to hear at the Commencement of the State University. I shall attempt to relate this anecdote as I heard it. Some time since a good old New England lady, who was president of a total abstinence society, had sent to her a jar of peaches preserved in brandy. She was exceedingly anxious to send a courteous reply to the kind friend who had thus remembered her and at the same time not to say anything that would in any way compromise her total abstinence principles. After laboring for several hours over the reply she finally succeeded in penning the following: “I thank you for your kindness in sending me the peaches; while I appreciate them for their own sake, I appreciate still more the spirit in which they were sent.” This sentiment expresses my feelings on this occasion. I most sincerely appreciate this beautiful gift, but in a still greater degree do I appreciate the kind spirit that prompted the givers. I thank you again and again for this kindness.

- In the July MONTHLY reference was made to the period of service of Supt. Mitchell, of Monroeville, as being thirteen years. It should have been fifteen years.

---Supt. F. S. Coultrap, who has been connected with the schools of Nelsonville for so many years, has been elected superintendent at Athens. He is succeeded at Nelsonville by E. S. Jones, formerly of this State, but for the past few years engaged in educational work at Coffeyville and Independence, Kan.

-As we go to press, the word reaches us that Washiqgton has surrendered to the Ohio School Teachers. We were sorry to be compelled to return so soon, but under the circumstances it was impossible. Miss Sutherland's account of the Great Meeting will appear in September.

Zemer, Ansonia, O.; C. H. Young, Carlisle, O.; Harriet Gilbert, South New Lyme, O.; Mary McKinney, Piqua, O.; Cora Morton, Norwood, O.; Nellie G. Pettigrew, Piqua, 0.; Clara M. Smith, West Alexandria, 0.

when after having greeted his wife, he felt himself entirely in the hands of his friends, and submitted to the order of Mr. E. W. Wilkinson, of Cincinnati, given in his own inimitable manner, to stand right there." What followed the stenographer gives.

SOMETHING GOOD NOT ON THE

PROGRAM.

REPORTED BY M. W. S.

On Wednesday evening a delightful surprise was planned by the friends of the retiring School Commissioner. The Associate Editor of the Monthly knowing how all his admirers throughout the State would wish to hear of it, took it upon herself to have a stenographer at hand to take down the speeches; and now prepares and sends to the printer a brief account of the affair, which will not come under the eye of the Editor until he sees it in print.

A number of the friends of Mr. Corson wishing to show their appreciation of his solid work, in a solid way, presented him with a beautiful solid silver tea set of colonial style. The inspiration which prompted the gift came too late to allow all who would have desired it to have part in the giving; but it stands for a testimony of the universal respect and affection of the teachers of our State. The secret was thoroughly kept and the surprise was complete when a friend of Mr. Corson's brought him into a large gathering of superintendents and teachers in the spacious parlors of Hotel Victory, Put-in-Bay, where he had simply been requested to come and meet a lady who desired to be presented to him. The "lady” turned out to be Mrs. Corson, of whose arrival her husband had not known until that moment. But we wished her to share in our joy. No one present will ever forget the genuine emotion depicted on the countenance of the Commissioner

ADDRESS OF MR. E. W. WILKINSON.

MR. CORSON: Some six years ago you called upon the teachers of the State of Ohio to support you in your candidacy for the office of State School Commissioner. Your friends, felt considerable hesitancy, based on a doubt as to your ability, which doubt was predicated upon your general appearance of greenness and other things; but to your support, nevertheless, they rallied. That you have given the teachers who supported you value received in the six years of your commissionership no one can doubt. It is now the pleasant duty of the teachers, upon whom you called for support to come to you to-night unsolicited and proffer to you a slight token of their appreciation of your efforts in their behalf during the past six years. Mr. Corson, in the name of the teachers of the State of Ohio, in their annual convention assembled, I take great pleasure, and esteem it an honor, to hand to you this present, as a token of the high regard in which you are held by the teachers of this State.

Take this present, Brother Corson; there is a part of every Buckeye teacher in it. As you look upon it in the future, remember there is a portion of every Buckeye teacher in it. Emerson has truly said, “Every gift in its truest sense must be a part of the giver,” and this represents what I may call a "composite” part of the state teachers. We are glad to have placed you in such a position, that if you should desire to forget Ohio, and your Ohio friends and associates, it will now be a matter of impossibility, so long as you do as the donors of this token desire; to wit, keep it always in sight. Take it, and take with it the prayer of every Buckeye teacher for your future happiness, welfare, and success.

FIELD NOTES. -Supt. W. McK. Vance, of Urbana, has been re-elected for three years at an annual salary of $1,800, and has also been made acting principal of the high school at an additional salary of $600.

REPLY OF MR.

CORSON.

-Supt. S. L. Rose, of Hamilton, has been re-elected for two years at an annual salary of $2,300.

-E. M. Craig, who has been the successful principal of the New Vienna high school for several years has been elected to the superintendency at Sabina.

-Supt. W. W. Boyd, formerly of Marietta, will take charge of the Painesville schools in September.

-Supt. Hall, of Huron, was very kindly remembered on his retirement, by his teachers, in the presentation of a beautiful gift.

MY FRIENDS: — I have oiten heard it said that language either expresses or conceals thought, but I am certain that no language can either express or conceal the emotions I now feel. It seems to me that during my whole life I have been the recipient of nothing but kind words and deeds; but this occasion furnishes the culmination of all kindness on the part of my friends. The only preparation I have had for this occasion is found in an anecdote which I was fortunate enough to hear at the Commencement of the State University. I shall attempt to relate this anecdote as I heard it. Some time since a good old New England lady, who was president of a total abstinence society, had sent to her a jar of peaches preserved in brandy. She was exceedingly anxious to send a courteous reply to the kind friend who had thus remembered her and at the same time not to say anything that would in any way compromise her total abstinence principles. After laboring for several hours over the reply she finally succeeded in penning the following: “I thank you for your kindness in sending me the peaches; while I appreciate them for their own sake, I appreciate still more the spirit in which they were sent." This sentiment expresses my feelings on this occasion. I most sincerely appreciate this beautiful gift, but in a still greater degree do I appreciate the kind spirit that prompted the givers. I thank you again and again for this kindness.

- In the July Monthly reference was made to the period of service of Supt. Mitchell, of Monroeville, as being thirteen years. It should have been fifteen years.

-Supt. F. S. Coultrap, who has been connected with the schools of Nelsonville for so many years, has been elected superintendent at Athens.

He is succeeded at Nelsonville by E. S. Jones, formerly of this State, but for the past few years engaged in educational work at Coffeyville and Independence, Kan.

-As we go to press, the word reaches us that Washington has surrendered to the Ohio School Teachers. We were sorry to be compelled to return so soon, but under the circumstances it was impossible. Miss Sutherland's account of the Great Meeting will appear in September.

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A TRIP TO WASHINGTON AND THE N. E. A. MEETING.

BY MARGARET W. SUTHERLAND.

After the good time at the State mington teachers, and others from meeting at Put-in-Bay, a few days the surrounding country. At Newintervened before the starting of ark, Principal E. E. Richards inthe various Ohio delegations for creased our numbers with a valuthe meeting of the National Edu- able contribution not only from that cational Association at Washing- city but from other places from ton. Large delegations started from which he had gathered interesting various sections of the State under young ladies. While at that stathe care of the different members tion Supt. E. D. Lyon, of Mansof the Transportation Committee field, brought his good company for Ohio; while many went in little made better by some delightful lady parties according to their own taste teachers from his enterprising or at the suggestion of traveling corps. Again at Barnesville Supt. passenger agents. If all the other E. M. Van Cleve and a large deleparties had as good a time as the gation were enthusiastically welone that started from Columbus on comed. This is the story of the the morning of July 6 on a special gathering of one of the Ohio clans train over the B. & O. R. R. we be- which was doubtless but the story lieve there will be pleasant memo- of many others. If I have omitted ries to brighten many dark days of some delegations that ought to the coming year. In it at the start have been mentioned, it must be were Supt. J. A. Shawan and fam- that their leader did not properly ily, Hon. O. T. Corson, a large del- report to me upon his arrival and egation of Columbus teachers, consequently misses a “society paabout half the corps of the Wil- ragraph.”

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