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dren and their parents go as the

shall tell at home. All that the people of Germany go to see great teacher has of culture from travel, works of art.

books, society, must reach from The various industries of the the school to the home; but this manufacturing world, commerce, can only be if the teacher realizes and many other forces working for that noise is purely a relative term. the same end, - the getting of a The school should not be withlivelihood, - have each a lesson. out proper recognition. In a large While the school, the church, and city a young clergyman made a the home working for spiritual very special study of a certain disends ought to act together all the trict in one of its most crowded sectime. Each has its distinctive work tions. He studied the condition of but each is dependent on the other. the people under every phase of There is not such recognition of their living, he tried to discern the the value of what the other is do- most potent factor in their elevaing as there should be. The ques- tion, and at a gathering of brother tion comes how can co-operation ministers when the question was be brought about? The school asked “What force is doing most should take the lead. The teacher for these people?" his answer withshould be more conscious of need out hesitation or reservation was of this union and should reach out ' "The public school." and invite the other forces to aid. This is a day of organization. The physician can be a great

What better can be organized than helper in the school. He under- public educational societies? Not stands so much of life, his informa- societies formed of critics of our tion concerning the homes repre

schools whose sole purpose is resented in the school is so full. By form but societies formed of teachan invitation to help he is often ers, parents, citizens, all alike inconverted from an unfriendly critic terested in the welfare of the of the school to its warm ally. schools.

The clergyman has something to. Brookline has an Educational say and from coming to deliver his Society now numbering 600 memmessage he learns what he has not bers. It was started by social leadbeen conscious of before of what ers. It has always had discussions the school is spiritually. He finds of educational questions free to all out how much there is in common members; but much of its most between his work and that of the important work is now done by

committees The school room must be a hap- Its committee on music has py place if the children are to carry brought fine musicians to the lesswith them that inspiration which favored districts of the city, has

teacher.

render on terms of their own mak- With this issue the MONTHLY ing. Now it is the custom in many closes its forty-seventh year.

It places for the children to present will soon be a half century old. to their teachers some little token

We trust that as a result of the conof their esteem and affection, and

tinued cordial support of the teachmany teachers in the next few days

ers of the State, it may grow in will have their hearts gladdened

strength as it grows in years, and by some such kind remembrance,

that it may always stand as an inon the part of their pupils. While

dex of the conservative, safe educafirmness is always a necessity in the management of any school,

tional thought of the day as repand sternness is sometimes de

resented by the practice of the best manded by extreme cases, yet

teachers of the State in whose inkindness and good will of teacher terests it was started by the State for pupils, and pupils for teacher Teachers' Association in 1852. are always characteristic of a good school. As we enter upon our Christmas vacation, we shall all do We devote considerable space well to make the beautiful senti- this month to an account of the ment expressed in the following Central Association meeting held quotation a part of our life:

at Columbus, November 4 and 5. “But I am sure I have always With the exception of the National thought of Christmas time, when it Association, the Central is probhas come around—apart from the ably the largest meeting of the kind veneration due to its sacred name in the United States. In addition and origin, if anything belonging to to the interesting general account it can be apart from that—as a of the great meeting furnished by good time; a kind, forgiving, char- Miss Sutherland, we are specially itable, pleasant time; the only time fortunate in being able to present I know of in the long calendar of the inaugural address of the presithe year, when men and women dent, F. B. Pearson of Columbus. seem by one consent to open their

President Pearson was the recipshut-up hearts freely, and to think ient of compliments and congratuof people below them as if they lations from all sources on the really were fellow-passengers to strength and originality of his adthe grave, and not another race of dress, and the success of the meetcreatures bound on other jour- ing over which he presided with

sich universal satisfaction.

neys."

was

THE CENTRAL OHIO TEACHERS' ASSO- sired or in suggesting schools to CIATION,

those who had no special place By Margaret W. Sutherland.

they wished to visit. The Central Ohio Teachers' As

The Columbus Teachers' Mutual sociation being the largest educa- Aid Association through a committional gathering of the State and tee of its Board of Control carried bringing distinguished educators

out the admirable idea of its presifrom various parts of the country dent Miss Anna Riordan of providto address it, deserves more than ing a Rest or Reception Room for a passing notice. Its annual ses- the delegates. This room was kept sion was held at Columbus, No

open for two days and words of unvember 4 and 5. The number in

qualified pleasure and gratitude attendance was very great. It was showed how it was appreciated. A variously estimated from eighteen large room centrally located was hundred to two thousand. But given free of rent by one of our citwhatever the exact number, the izens, and this was not only comfact remains that at the opening fortably but elegantly furnished by session on Friday afternoon the enterprising Columbus merchants Great Southern Theater

on the block of High street bepacked to the highest gallery, hun- tween Broad and Gay streets. dreds stood unable to find seats, While the Columbus Gas Co. put and a great many being unable to in fixtures and furnished light and find entrance spent the afternoon heat for two days free of charge. in visiting different places of inter- It would be hard to tell how est in the city.

pleased the Columbus teachers Columbus had never made better were at this mark of appreciation preparations for the entertainment from representative business men of her guests. At the Union Sta

of the city. tion on Friday morning they were The committee in charge of the met by the superintendent, the su- Rest Room had the assistance for pervisors of music, drawing, pen- two days of the superintendent's manship, and physical culture, and clerk and five alumnae of the nora committee of young ladies from mal school, who welcomed visitors, the normal school.

checked their baggage and parcels, According to a time-honored and in various ways administered plan Friday morning is spent in to their comfort. Nearly all the visiting the schools of whatever leading current magazines were on city the Association is held in. The the tables for those who desired to committee at the station was there read while resting or waiting for to render assistance to the visiting friends. teachers in finding any school de- At about 2 P. M. Friday, Supt. J. A. Shawan called the Associa- generally' replies by naming the tion to order and introduced to the school at which he received instrucaudience its new president F. B. tion; but the truth is that he is edPearson, principal of the East high ucated by many forces outside of school of Columbus, who delivered school, forces of unmeasured an inaugural address on “The Evo- strength. Do we invoke the aid of lution of the School Master", these other forces as much as we which won high encomiums from should? Institutions

represent all who heard it. So many ex- what has been accomplished; they pressed a desire to possess this ad- are the wheat separated from chaff. mirable paper that the MONTHLY The church is distinctly an educahas secured it and will publish it in tional force; through organized full.

work it calls out the best in life. After another delightful song The home is what the school is not, from the quartet which under the - an end in itself. Everything we direction of Supervisor W. H. Lott hope for, live for, centers in home. had already captured the hearts of The Master forever dignified home the audience, the president intro- when He said “In my Father's duced Supt. S. T. Dutton, of house are many mansions.” In the Brookline, Mass., who addressed home affection has its choicest fruithe meeting upon "Educational tion. School life should be a conForces and their Relation to Each tinuation of home life. Other.” Mr. Dutton began by say- The public newspaper is an eduing that he had not come to sug- cational force. It is certain there gest any new work, any new stud- is a difference in papers; but the ies, or any new methods. In fact good newspaper is a photograph of in seeing the number of subjects on a cross section of the world's life. many of the programs of our It is a constant educative power, schools at the present time, he was recognizing too the field of educareminded of the little boy who tion and devoting space to it. seated for a feast at an overloaded The civic state with all that it table said as his blessing "O Lord, presents of order, public spirit of help us to take small bites and eat men manifested in public buildslow."

ings, public money expended for The speaker said that he had but the general good, are all educative a simple message to bring, but the and should act more on the young. suggestion that instead of adding The social mind, or public opinanything to our curriculum we call ion, has an important effect in adto our aid other forces than those vancing education.

vancing education. It makes posof the school. When a man is sible public collections of art. In asked where he was educated, he a little city of New England chil

dren and their parents go as the shall tell at home. All that the people of Germany go to see great

teacher has of culture from travel, works of art.

books, society, must reach from The various industries of the the school to the home; but this manufacturing world, commerce, can only be if the teacher realizes and many other forces working for that noise is purely a relative term. the same end, - the getting of a The school should not be withlivelihood, have each a lesson. out proper recognition. In a large While the school, the church, and city a young clergyman made a the home working for spiritual very special study of a certain disends ought to act together all the trict in one of its most crowded sectime. Each has its distinctive work tions. He studied the condition of but each is dependent on the other. the people under every phase of There is not such recognition of their living, he tried to discern the the value of what the other is do- most potent factor in their elevaing as there should be. The ques- tion, and at a gathering of brother tion comes how can co-operation ministers when the question was be brought about? The school asked “What force is doing most should take the lead. The teacher for these people?” his answer withshould be more conscious of need out hesitation or reservation was of this union and should reach out • "The public school." and invite the other forces to aid. This is a day of organization.

The physician can be a great What better can be organized than helper in the school. He under- public educational societies? Not stands so much of life, his informa- societies formed of critics of our tion concerning the homes repre- schools whose sole purpose is resented in the school is so full. By form, but societies formed of teachan invitation to help he is often ers, parents, citizens, all alike inconverted from an unfriendly critic terested in the welfare of the of the school to its warm ally. schools.

The clergyman has something to Brookline has an Educational say and from coming to deliver his Society now numbering 600 memmessage he learns what he has not bers. It was started by social leadbeen conscious of before of what ers. It has always had discussions the school is spiritually. He finds of educational questions free to all out how much there is in common members; but much of its most between his work and that of the important work is now done by teacher.

committees. The school room must be a hap- Its committee on music has py place if the children are to carry brought fine musicians to the less with them that inspiration which favored districts of the city, has

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