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Exp. 26. To Make a Siphon Spring

the water you can have the spring flow at regular intervals of from a minute or two to a half hour if you so desire. Use the rubber tube to show pupils the action of a plain siphon.

Exp. 27. To Make a Constant Fountain.

А

Fig.VI.

Fig.VII.

To illustrate the subject of intermittent springs in geography, arrange apparatus as shown in Fig. VI. Select a good heavy bottle holding say a pint. With a broken file or brass tube and emery powder bore a } or 4 in. hole as indicated in figure. Bend and insert a glass tube of į in. or even larger diameter. A small tube does not succeed well because of capillarity. Place a bucket of water two or three feet above the bottle and by means of a small rubber tube siphon the water into the bottle. By putting a wood plug in the lower end of the rubber tube to regulate the flow of

Your pupils will work out No. 27 for you and be delighted with the success of the experiment. If the fittings at A are air tight the fountain will flow until it is empty. Fill A 1 full of water, then fasten to a hook or nail on the wall, mean

time keeping the lower ends of the fall and rise by placing the mouth tubes closed until A is in position. to the bottle and condensing and Make the opening of the jet tube exhausting the air. in A small so that the vessel does In the next number I shall exnot empty too rapidly. To stop plain how C may be used to make the fountain, plug the lower ends of an amusing Lung Test. the tubes.

(To be Continued.)

Exp. 28. Another Lung Test or the Bottle Imp.

It is with sincere regret that we again state that Prof. Mills is quite ill, and therefore unable to prepare his article on Arithmetic,

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" FROM THE LAKES TO THE SEA."

To the Editor:

An article with the above caption may be found in the “Review of

Reviews" for November, which all Fiy VII.

teachers of Geography will find The Cartesian Diver costing fruitful and suggestive in that, diusually $1.00 to $2.50 can be made rectly and incidentally, it gives a in a few minutes and without cost. clear notion of the Chicago DrainBy reference to Fig. 8, C is a small age Canal, the importance, comphial closed by a cork having a slot mercially, of Chicago, Cleveland, cut in the side of the cork and Buffalo, Detroit River, and the weighted down by a small nail or a southern coast of Lake Erie, the screw. The delicate part of the ex- difficulties in the way of utilizing periment is to put just enough wa- the Welland Canal as an outlet to ter into C that it will barely float. the sea, and many other facts with In other words, the specific gravity which progressive teachers should of C must be a little less than that be somewhat conversant. of water. Drop C into a fruit jar This article might well be subor wide-mouthed bottle of water stituted for the more formal geogfilled to within } inch of the top. raphy for an entire week, and all Stretch tightly over the top of jar pupils as well as the teacher be a piece of sheet rubber and tie in gainers by the substitution. Inplace. Then by pressure on rub- deed it may well be doubted ber the "diver" will descend but whether the study of Geography ascend with removal of pressure.

ever attains its true importance in If you prefer, it may be made to any schools where such supple

to

mentary work, as this article sug- Conventional designs and patgests, is not done.

terns, to teach them to be neat and F. B. PEARSON. exact.

Point and line drawing, THE TEACHING OF DRAWING. strengthen the muscles and to (Answers to questions in January MONTHLY.

teach the eye to see straight. By Ida G. Doute, St. Marys, 0.]

5. (a) Yes. (b) By overdoing 1. Because the average teacher it. (c) Yes. does not know what, or how to 6. There are very few. draw.

7. (a) Perspective should be 2. The special purpose of draw- taught by rule in the grammar ing in primary grades is to teach grades but not in the primary. (6) pupils to see. In the intermediate, Shading should not begin until the to see and put down what they see. pupil is able to represent form by In the grammar not only to teach outline and that correctly. them perception and expression 8. (a) Where it enables the pupil but exactness.

to put down what he sees and 3. The most profitable material thinks. (b) No. (c) Not necessarily. is that which they can see and get. 9. It should cultivate the imagDo not have them draw tubs, buck- ination also. ets, elephants, flowers and such 10. First have them know a few things from memory, as that is of the principles of drawing or art. teaching drawing with your eyes Then practice faithfully and dilishut. Let them draw what they can gently. But it can never be a sucsee from the objects.

cess unless they have some love for 4. Drawing of types is profitable the work. The only way is to go only as it comes up in their work. to work and draw.

0. T. R. C. DEPARTMENT.

NATURE STUDY. No. 3.

It will be queer to change our name BY J. J. BURNS.

for it when we talk of the glories Hopkinsville, Ky, Jan. 1, 1898.

or the shames of the century unless The year died in the night. we practice betimes on the "TwenThree years from this morning tieth." I wish we had some short those of us who still walk in the word in English for our hundredlight will think and perhaps say, year period, like hour, day, week, “The century died in the night.” month.

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It was a piece of that good luck stand on. At the evening session which has fallen to, or into, my I talked on A State Reading Circle. lot - in small bits — to have the The little capital is old-fashioned chance to attend the annual meet- to a degree. The country around ing of Kentucky school superin- is wild and picturesque, the Kentendents this week at Frankfort. tucky river winds among hills that About seventy men were present,

are mountains to the eye of one county and town, or city, superin- fresh from the plains of the lower tendents in about equal numbers; Auglaize. seven ladies, each a county super

In the afternoon of my second intendent. Is the political route to

day I paid a visit of respect and a superintendency more readily curiosity to the grave of Daniel

Boone. His monument looks travelled by our sisters? In each of eighteen counties a woman fills

down upon the river from the top

of one of those hills. About it a this responsible office; elected thereto upon a party ticket; some

group of sycamore trees stand sen

. times her defeated opponent, a

tinel. Upon the four faces of the

stone are what is left of carvings woman.

which once stood for scenes in the The discussions were over such

old fighter's life; but everything subjects as the relation of the office

that would break has been carried of superintendent of public instruc

off by that despicable despoiler, the tion to the schools, training schools,

relic hunter, in whose barbarous rural graded schools, the examina

eyes there is nothing sacred. tion and certification of teachers,

Another of my digressions was city school systems, our trustee sys- a run down to Nashville. The road tem, what shall the grades teach,

passes by some deep cuts through associations district and county, the immense limestone ridges which local taxation.

there bound the valley of the CumThe speakers were plainly in ear- berland. Returning, as ours was nest and in the clash of opinions an inspection train, it ran up a short there was frequent and skillful branch to the county seat of Todd thrust and parry.

County. One of the things to know Some school legislation was about this county is that within its formulated, and the brethren limits Abraham Lincoln and Jefseemed confident that the legis- ferson Davis were born. At least lature would lend an open ear to so people say, but it is likely that an any rational proposition upon which alibi can be proved as to Mr. L. themselves should agree!

I observed several flocks of field They made me an honorary larks as we passed through northmember and gave me the floor to ern Tennessee.

mentary work, as this article sug- Conventional designs and patgests, is not done.

terns, to teach them to be neat and F. B. PEARSON. exact.

Point and line drawing, to THE TEACHING OF DRAWING. strengthen the muscles and to

teach the eye to see straight. (Answers to questions in January MONTHLY. By Ida G. Doute, St. Marys, 0.)

5. (a) Yes. (b) By overdoing 1. Because the average teacher it. (c) Yes. does not know what, or how to 6. There are very few. draw.

7. (a) Perspective should be 2. The special purpose of draw- taught by rule in the grammar ing in primary grades is to teach grades but not in the primary. (b) pupils to see. In the intermediate, Shading should not begin until the to see and put down what they see. pupil is able to represent form hy In the grammar not only to teach outline and that correctly. them perception and expression 8. (a) Where it enables the pupil but exactness.

to put down what he sees and 3. The most profitable material thinks. (b) No. (c) Not necessarily. is that which they can see and get. 9. It should cultivate the imagDo not have them draw tubs, buck- ination also. ets, elephants, flowers and such 10. First have them know a few things from memory, as that is of the principles of drawing or art. teaching drawing with your eyes Then practice faithfully and dilishut. Let them draw what they can gently. But it can never be a sucsee from the objects.

cess unless they have some love for 4. Drawing of types is profitable the work. The only way is to go only as it comes up in their work. to work and draw.

0. T. R. C. DEPARTMENT.

No. 3.

NATURE STUDY.

It will be queer to change our name BY J. J. BURNS.

for it when we talk of the glories Hopkinsville, K'y., Jan. 1, 1898. or the shames of the century unless

The year died in the night. we practice betimes on the "TwenThree years from this morning

tieth.” I wish we had some short those of us who still walk in the word in English for our hundredlight will think and perhaps say, year period, like hour, day, week, “The century died in the night.” month.

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