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sississippi river, in an eastwardly direc. county, Illinois, is situated a remarkable ut of the level prairie of the American hree miles from the bluffs, or high-lands, he margin of the prairie. The greater rm of a parallelogram, and is estimated

feet high. Its top is flat, and presents out in a garden, planted with fruit and

esidence of the proprietor. On the .ce, about two hundred and fifty yards y level, and elevated about forty-five . At the distance of a quarter of a k enters Cahokia creek, and the latter nd fifty yards of the northern base vo hundred yards, on a small mound, p of a community of Monks of the

place took the name of · Monks' mounds, about sixty feet apart at them rises very steeply in a coni.

near the top of it. At a distance of a dragoon, with a feather in the und immediately at the base, is a

little stretch of the imagination 'evating the mounds was taken uds altogether on the Ameri. 9 hundred in number. They e of them are crowned with pnturies. They are all comany stones in them, except

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ABOUT six miles from the Mississippi river, in an eastwardly direction from St. Louis, in St. Clair county, Illinois, is situated a remarkable group of mounds, which rise out of the level prairie of the American Bottom, at a distance of two or three miles from the bluffs, or high-lands, and range semi-circularly with the margin of the prairie. The greater one, or Monks' Mound, is in the form of a parallelogram, and is estimated to be one hundred and twenty-five feet high. Its top is flat, and presents an area of about two acres, laid out in a garden, planted with fruit and shade-trees, and containing the residence of the proprietor. On the south side of this mound is a terrace, about two hundred and fifty yards long, and ninety in width, perfectly level, and elevated about forty-five feet above the surface of the prairie. At the distance of a quarter of a mile to the north-east, Cantine creek enters Cahokia creek, and the latter winds around within one hundred and fifty yards of the northern base of the mound. To the west, some two hundred yards, on a small mound, was formerly the principal residence of a community of Monks of the Order of La Trappe, from whom the place took the name of • Monks' Mound.' Southwardly there are two mounds, about sixty feet apart at the base, and sixty feet high. One of them rises very steeply in a coni. cal form, and has a large tree growing near the top of it. At a distance it looks not unlike a large helmet-cap of a dragoon, with a feather in the șide. On the west of these mounds, and immediately at the base, is a large pond ; and it requires but a very little stretch of the imagination to suppose that all the earth used in elevating the mounds was taken from the bed of the pond. The mounds altogether on the American Bottom have been estimated at two hundred in number. They are of various forms and sizes, and some of them are crowned with trees, that must have been growing for centuries. They are all composed of the same kind of earth, without any stones in them, except

25

VOL. XXV.

liquid seas in merriment till the thirtieth day, made us the sport of danger, struggling with such mighty waves as oftimes made us seem to climb up mountains of salt water, and straitway precipitated headlong as it were 'twixt cloven seas; a good while heaven and sea seeming undeuided. This put me in mind of the third ode in the first Lib. of HORACE, where 'tis said :

* A HEART of brass that man had sure,
Who in a barque didst first endure
The raging seas, not valuing life,
Midst fierce south-west and north-wind strife.'

Of the Canary Isles he remarks: “A word of what they were. They knew no God but Nature ; were ignorant of the use of fire; shaved with Alint-stones ; gave their children to be nursed with goats; cultured the earth with the horns of oxen; abominated the slaughter of beasts ; for

how can they be good
Who dare each day imbrue their hands in blood ?'

no meum and tuum lust and carelessness vailing them so, as little difference was twixt them and other animals. Some glimmering, one would think, they had of the immortality of the soul, for the dead they washed and kept erected in a cave, a staff in one hand and a pail of milk and wine set near him to support and comfort him in his pilgrimage to Elysium. At this day they are reduced to civility, and become Spanish Christians. Canariæ, so called, a multitudine canorum, saith Pliny, about which there is no small difference among writers, some placing them at the Azores, some at the Hesperides ; but certain it is they were undiscovered, but more certainly uninhabited, till the yeare 1328, by one Machan, an Englishman, from whose relation one LEWIS DE Cordeza two years after sailed thither.' Proceeding on his voyage, “the air and ocean contending who should make the greater noise, nevertheless hoping in the LORD, and having the ships of our fleet, which were all disperst, meet joyfully at the Cape of Good Hope, I had better leisure to contemplate that ironiquest satyr of JUVENAL:

I nunc et ventis animam committe."

The author rather doubts the limits of the dominion of that mighty potentate PRESTER John, concerning whom the Roman emissaries have spoken liberally: he will not call it a pious fraud, but they assumed too great a liberty in blazoning the success of their labors. After stating at much length the conclusive reasons for his belief, our author says: “We may well question the extent of his empire, and give it equal credit as we do the library of the European friers found in the Castle of Amara, where, among the rest, were some Ms. of Enoch and Live! Of St. Helena he remarks: “The Ile is hard to be ascended : not that the passage is craggy, but that it is so precipitous. The sailors have an ironick proverb, . The way is such as a man may chuse whether he will break his heart going up or his neck coming down.' But being once up, scarce any place can yield a more large and delightful prospect. The land is very even and plain at the top, and swells no where to a deformed rising. Some springs above be sweet which below are brackish. The reason may be, that in their drilling descent they may relish of the salt hills through which it cuts its passage, so that they become salt both by their own composition and the salt breath which the sea evaporates.

Nevertheless, there are but two noted rivulets, the one which bubbles down toward the Chappel, the other into the Lemon valley. There are also some ruins of a little town lately demolished by the Spaniards, in that it became a magazine of private trade, in turning and returning out of both Indies. No other monuments or antiquities are there found. Human inhabitants there are none, nor were of late, save that in the year 1591 Captain RENDALL, weighing anchor sooner than was expected, one LEGUR, a mariner, was accidentally left ashore. Eighteen months after, Captain Parker coming to anchor, found poor Legur alive, but so amazed, or rather overjoyed, at his arrival, that he dyed suddenly; by which we see that sudden joy is not easily diges. ted. Howbeit of hogs and goals, here are plenty who agree well-favouredly, and multiply

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