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Lines from a Humble Lover to a Cruel Sonnet Addressed by an Old Husband to a

Lady,....

.340 Young Wife..

.310

Lines to my Sister,.

.404 Sketches of the Great West. By LEWIS F.

Lines on the Death of a Beloved Child, 1.441

THOMAS, Esq.,...

..316

Legal Maxims, and so forth,.

.460 Scene in a Parisian Court of Justice,. .359

Lines ou the Twin Live Oaks, at Beverly, Sketch of MIRABEAU B. LAMAR. By FRAN-

Georgia,....

494 CIS COPCUTT,

377

Stanzas to Fanny. By ALBERT PIKE, Esq.,..387

M.

Some Thoughts on Dreams,.

.413

Some Thoughts on Bores,

.457

My Grand-father's Portfolio,.

.25, 482 Shadows. By Rev. WILLIAM THOMPSON

More of Sands' Literary Remains, The Black

BACON....

518

Vampyre,.....

73

Masculine and Femine Rivers,.

..159

T.

Mrs. ELIZABETH BARRETT BARRETT's

Poems,....

.173 The Desert of the World: An Allegory,.... 13

MAPES' Address Before the Mechanics' Insti The Dream of a Child. By JOHN H. RHEYN, 31

tute,...

255 The Dream-Angel. After JEAN PAUL,. 44

Mater Dolerosa,

.325 The St. Leger Papers,.

.47, 243, 433

Morus Multicaulis at Tindecum,..

405 The Dying Year. By Miss MARY GARDINER, 53

My Grand-father's House,.

.441 The Bench and Bar of Vermont,

55

My Early Love. By ALFRED TENNYSON, The Poor: God help them! By Miss MARY

Esq., England,....

487 E. Hewitt,

65

Mrs. CHILD's Letters from New York, ..547 The Attache: or SAM SLick in England, 66

Madame Orto's Concert,

.552 The Drama....

79

Men Without Souls,..

.534 The Destruction of Carthage. By Miss MARY

GARDINER,

....103

N.

The Voyage of Life. By John H. RHEYN,.. 108

The Musical Neighbors: A Sketch from Life,122

New Year Fancies,..

.135 The Stage considered as a Moral Institution...129

Noah's Discourse on the Restoration of the The Waif: A Poetical Collection. By H.

Jews.....

.249 W.LONSFELLOW....

.165

Notre-Dame Aux Violettes, a Legend,

...360

The Weeper's Dream. By Wm. WILSON,....196

Necessity for a National Literature,.. .415 | The Ranger's Adventure,

198

The Wits End:' A Retort Legal,..

201

0.

The Adventure, or the Speculator's Victim,..208

The Walking Gentlemen. Number One,....209

On Perception. By JOHN WATERS,.. .312 The Soldier's Bride: A Tribute of Affection, 223

On the Received Laws of Planetary Mo The Shower-Bath Evaded : A Fragment,. ..234

tion,...

..519

The Lost Fawn: An Authentic Sketch. By

ROPER,...

235

P.

The Lady Ann: A Ballad. By JOHN G.

SAXE, Esq......

248

Poems, by Mrs. MARY N. M'DONALD,.

The Payment of the Pennsylvania Interest,..257

Passages from the Russian of KARAMSIN,....109

The late MATTHEW C. FIELD. Phazina?

Phreno-Moemotechny, or the Art of Memory, 352 at Niagara,..

262

Poems by WILLIAM W. LORD,..

.548 The Study of Natural History as a School-

Classic,...

283

Q.

The Advent of Spring: An Ode of Horace, 296

Quoters and Quotations; Plagiarists and Pla-

The Scalp-Hunter: A Semi-historical Sketch,297

giarisms,..

32

.332, 471

The Polygon Papers,..

The Gales of Spring. By CLAUD HALCRO,-346

The Chemist's Dream,

..347

R.

Thoughts at Mount Hope,.

.357

Reminiscences by an Old Man,..

46 The Duty of the American Teacher. By J.

.354

Reminiscences of the Last Sixty-Five Years, 70

N. BELLOws, Esq.,..

216

Requiem for the Departed,..

351

The Library of American Biography,...

The Phariseeism of the Age,.

.397

S.

The Foreign Missionary's Call: A Dream,...423

Thoughts in Spring-Time,.

427

Stanzas for Two Voices. By JOHN WATERS, 43 The Seven Tyrants,

428

Stanzas: You and I. By WILLIAM Pitt PAL Temperance Dick: An Epigram,

.440

MER, Esq.,....

45 The North American Review for April,. .453

Sonnet: To Reason,.

65 The Doom of Malaga. By Miss Mary Gar-

Something to Die For,.

.104 DINER,..

.480

St. Valentine's Day, and other Matters, .126 The Friends: A Colloquy. Number One,...488

Stanzas: Saturday Evening,

.134 The Solitude of the Soul. By Mrs. Enpslo,..503

SANDS'. Black Vampyre,'.

.171 The Pilgrimage of Life. By Wm.J. COLGAN,.519

Sketches of the Great West. By Lewis F.

The Widow's Hone. By Mary A. LAWSON,.526

Thomas, Esq.,.

189 The Fountain. By Rev. WM. T. Bacon,..533

Sonnet : Mary, the Mother of JESUS,'. ..215

Stanzas: November. By H. M. IDE.jr.,.. .227

W.

Society for the Promotion of Mutual Admira-

tion,..

259

Within the Veil. By Rev. EDWARD WHITE,

235

Stanzas : To My Vino: A Similitude,

.304

England,...

Scenes at Constantinople : The Holy Month,

Y.

Ramazan,..

6.305
Stanzas: To a very Short Lady,.

.479 Yonondio: or Warriors of the Genessee,....72

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ABT. I. LETTERS FROM CUBA. NUMBER THREE, .

II. THE BIRDS OF PASSAGE, By E. GALLAUDET,
III. THE DESERT OF THE WORLD. AN ALLEGORY,
IV. GOSSIP OF A PLAYER. BY THE LATE WILLIAM ABBOTT,
V. L'ENVOI: TO A LADY. BY H. W. ROCKWELL, Esq., .
VI. MY GRAND-FATHER'S PORT-FOLIO. NUMBER SEVEN,
VII. THE DREAM OF A CHILD. By John RHEYN,
VIII. QUOTERS AND QUOTATIONS: PLAGIARISTS AND PLAGIARISMS, .
IX. STANZAS FOR TWO VOICES: THE PARTING. BY JOHN WATERS,
X. THE DREAM-ANGEL. AFTER JEAN PAUL,
XI. STANZAS: YOU AND I. BY WILLIAM Pitt PALMER, Esq.,
XIL. REMINISCENCES OF AN OLD MAN,
XIII. THE ST. LEDGER PAPERS. BY “THE YOUNG ENGLISHMAN,'
XIV. THE DYING YEAR. By Miss MARY GARDINER,
XV. THE BENCH AND BAR OF VERMONT. BY JOHN G. SAXE, Esq.,
XVI. DEATII: THE RECORD OF A DREAM, ..
XVII. AN HOUR ON LAKE ST. PETER. By Frangis COPCUTT,
XVIII. THE POOR: GOD HELP THEM, By Mrs. M. E. HEWITT, .
XIX. SONNET': TO REASON,

45

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LITERARY NOTICES :
1. THE ATTACHE: OR SAM SLICK IN ENGLAND, .

66 2. REMINISCENCES OF THE LAST SIXTY-FIVE YEARS. BY MR. E. S. Thomas, 70 3. POEMS BY MRS. MARY NOEL MCDONALD,

71 4. YONNONDIO: OR WARRIORS OF THE GENNESSEE. By W. H. C. HOSMER, 72

EDITOR'S TABLE:

73

1. MORE OF SAND'S LITERARY REMAINS. "THE BLACK VAMPYRE,'
2. CONFORMITY OF RELIGION AND TASTE,

78

3. THE DRAMA: THE BOHEMIAN GIRL: TH

IT

IAN OPERA, ETC.,

79

81

4. GOSSIP WITH READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS,
1. NEW YEAR REFLECTIONS. 2. WORD-PICTURINGS: BRYANT AND LONGFELLOW.

3. MR. GEORGE JONES, THE HUMBUGEOUS INDIVIDUAL. 4. MORE OF THE ME-
MORIAL OF THE ANCIENT SHU.' 5. A NEW PLAN FOR GAINING WEALTH. 6. PRO-
FESSED PUBLIC WRANGLERS. 7. THE GREAT GUN: PUNCH: THE COMIC
BLACKSTONE:' MEETING OF GAME.' 8. TIGG IN THE LITERARY EMPORIUM :' A
REGULAR Do.' 9. YOUR TRUE CONVERSATIONALIST.' 10. The LITERARY ANTI-
PODES

11. NEWPORT: MAKING GAME' OF Fisk. 12. Miss Jane Porter: ABIDING LOVE. 13. A MUSICAL PHENOMENON. 14. 'How to OBSERVE:' A QUACK DOCTOR. 15. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE PAST AND PRESENT. 16. FESTIVAL OF SAINT NICHOLAS. 17. A KNOTTY LEGAL QUESTION. 18. "My BRINDLED ONE:' A PARODY. 19. ANTI-CELESTIAL · RED THIEVES. 20. PRIMITIVE THANKSGIVINGS. 21. ' CLERICAL ABSOLUTIONS.' 22. 'DocTORING' PICTURES: "THE OLD MASTERS.' 23. NATURE'S FLITTING MEMENTOES. 24. The High vs. THE LOWER CLASSES OF GREAT BRITAIN. 25. RIDICULOUS ERRORS IN TRANSLATION. 26. A SINGULAR SURGICAL CURE. 27. HONORS TO MEN OF LETTERS. 28. OUR TWENTY-FIFTH VOLUME. 29. NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS. 30. THE LONDON LANCET: MESSRS. BURGESS, STRINGER AND COMPANY'S ESTABLISHMENT. 31. ANECDOTE OF JARVIK THE PAINTER: PAINTINGS OF HIS SON. 32. Boyd's NEW CITY EXPRES. 33. DICKINSON'S BOSTON ALMANACK.' 34. DEFERRED Notices.

I MR. HUEston, a gentleman of character and standing, is about visiting the South and South-west, upon business connected with this and similar establishments. He will receive subscriptions for the KNICKERBOCKER; and our friends will confer a favor upon the Editor, by rendering him such aid, and extending to him such courtesies, as may be in their power.

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Havana, November 18, 1844, The political changes adopted in Spain in 1812 and 1820 were productive of similar changes in the island; and when in both instances the constitution was proclaimed, the perpetual members of the municipalities were at once deprived of office, and their successors elected by the people. The provincial assembly was called, and held its sessions. The militia was organized; the press made entirely free, the verdict of a jury deciding actions for its abuses; and the same courts were in no in. stance to determine a cause the second time. But if the institution of the Consulado was very beneficent during Ferdinand's absolute sway, the ultra-popular grants of the constitutional system, which could hardly be exercised with quiet in Spain, were ill-adapted to a country more advanced in civilization, and stained with all those vices that are the legitimate curse of a slave country. That system was so democratic, that the king was deprived of all political authority. No intermediate house of nobility or senators tempered the enactments of a single elective assembly. This sudden change from a very absolute government, with its usual concomitant, a corrupt and debased public sentiment, to the full enjoyment of republican privileges, served only to loosen all the ties of decency and decorum throughout the Spanish community. Infidelity resulted from it; and that veil of respect for the religion of their fathers, which still covered the deformity of such a state of society, was imprudently thrown aside. As the natural consequence of placing the instruments of freedom in the hands of an ignorant multitude, their minds were filled with visions of that chimerical equality which the world is never to realize. The rich found themselves deprived of their accustomed influence, and felt that there was little chance of obtaining justice from the common people, (in no place so formidable as in Cuba, from the heterogeneous nature of the population,) and who were now, in a manner, arrayed against them throughout the land. They, of course, eagerly wished the return of the old system of absolute rule. Bus VOL. XXV.

1

I would here remark, and particularly call your attention to the fact, that the proprietors only asked for that liberal and noble policy which they had enjoyed at the hands of the Spanish monarch; not, inost surely, that oppressive and nondescript government which, by separating the interest of the country from that of her nearest rulers, and destroying all means of redress or complaint, has thrust the last offspring of Spain into an abyss of bloodshed and ruin.

During the second period of democratic, or what was called constitutional government, which commenced in 1820, the masonic societies came into vogue here as they did in the mother country. They adopted different plausible pretexts, though to speak the truth, they were little more than clubs for amusement and revelry. One of them, called the

Sons of Bolivar,' went so far as to discuss whether, in case of a Columbian invasion, it would be more expedient to avoid a collision in the presence of the slaves, by giving way peaceably before the invading army. Happily for Cuba, and certainly in consequence of the judicious interference of the United States, which foresaw in the preservation of its tranquillity the advantages of a fruitful commerce, the invasion did not take place. And if the island has since had to lament the gradual encroachments of the executive, in all the several branches of its politics and administration, it has also been preserved from the sanguinary results which the premature establishment of ultra free institutions has produced in all the numerous countries which once formed the dominion of Spain in America. They may now be recovering from the anarchical effects of the sudden change ; but that they have experienced a severe scourge, the principal and only fruits of independence to the first generation of its recipients, the people of Cuba are most thoroughly convinced. We must, however, consider that the subsequent jealous policy of the Spanish government has been altogether unwarranted.

First, because those discussions of the Sons of Bolivar' were owing to the countenance of the liberal government given to those very societies; a thing entirely uncalled for among a people permitted to meet freely and name a portion of their rulers.

Secondly, because for political ends, no property qualification was required; a provision which, however well adapted to a country like ours, where constitutional rights have been exercised ever since colonial times, could not be safely overlooked in one just emerging from a despotic though beneficent government.

Thirdly, because a respectable portion of the old Spaniards residing here were themselves desirous of upholding the constitutional system in Cuba which they saw tottering in Spain. General Vives, who commanded at that time, regarded the circumstance with anxious solịcitude, and very reasonably inferred that, if the constitution of 1812 was sustained in this country after the king's absolute power was acknowledged in Spain, the consequences would be fatal to its dependence, however rational and honest the views of the constitutionalists might be considered. Hence his strenuous efforts in 1824, after the restoration of Fer. dinand, to make the most of the wild and varying schemes which had been proposed in the Soles de Bolivar, under the democratic institutions, and of the relaxation of the reins of government I have described. The

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